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centriole

centriole A structure associated with the centrosome and found mainly in animal cells. It consists of two short cylinders, orientated at right angles to each other and composed of microtubules. When present, the centriole replicates during the nondividing phase of the cell cycle, and during the prophase of mitosis a centriole migrates with each centrosome to lie at opposite poles of the cell. It was formerly believed that the centrioles were involved in assembly of the spindle microtubules, but this role is now in doubt – they are not present in the cells of most higher plants, and their removal from cells does not affect spindle formation. See also undulipodium.

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centriole

centriole A hollow, cylindrical structure, normally one of a pair lying at right angles to one another, adjacent to the nuclear envelope in animal cells, and composed of nine sets of microtubules, each set arranged in triplets. Centrioles are thought to be organizers of microtubular structures in these cells, and during cell division a pair is found at each pole of the mitotic spindle.

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centriole

centriole In plants, a cylindrical organelle occurring in flagellated or ciliated cells, where it acts as a precursor to the basal body of each flagellum or cilium. Centrioles are absent from higher plants.

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centriole

centriole (sen-tri-ohl) n. a small particle found in the cytoplasm of cells, near the nucleus. Centrioles are involved in the formation of the spindle and aster during cell division.

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centriole

centriole: see mitosis.

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