Skip to main content
Select Source:

Rayleigh scattering

Rayleigh scattering The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by spherical particles with radii that are less than 10 per cent that of the wavelength of the incident radiation. Such scattering by air molecules produces the blue colour of the sky. Particles such as dust and smoke, which are significantly smaller than 0.4 μm (the wavelength of the blue/violet or lower limit of the visible spectrum) can also scatter visible radiation. Reddish colours at sunset and sunrise result from Rayleigh scattering; these longer wavelengths pass directly through the atmosphere to the observer, while particles in the air scatter out radiation of shorter wavelengths. The phenomenon was described by the English physicist Baron Rayleigh ( John William Strutt, 1842–1919). See also Mie scattering.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Rayleigh scattering." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Rayleigh scattering." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rayleigh-scattering-0

"Rayleigh scattering." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rayleigh-scattering-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Rayleigh scattering

Rayleigh scattering The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by spherical particles with radii that are less than 10% that of the wavelength of the incident radiation. Such scattering by air molecules produces the blue effect of the sky. Particles such as dust and smoke, that are significantly smaller than 0.4 μm (the wavelength of the blue/violet or lower limit of the visible spectrum) can also scatter visible radiation. Reddish colours at sunset and sunrise result from Rayleigh scattering; these longer wavelengths pass directly through the atmosphere to the observer, while particles in the air scatter out radiation of shorter wavelengths. See also MIE SCATTERING.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Rayleigh scattering." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Rayleigh scattering." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rayleigh-scattering

"Rayleigh scattering." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rayleigh-scattering

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Rayleigh Scattering

Rayleigh Scattering

Why is the sky blue, and why are sunsets red? The answer is Rayleigh scattering. When light strikes small particles, it bounces off in different directions, a process called scattering. Rayleigh scattering is the scattering that occurs when the particles are smaller than the wavelength of the light. Blue light has a wavelength of about 400 nanometers, and red light has a wavelength of about 700 nanometers. Other colors of light are in between. A nanometer is a billionth of a meter. So, for Rayleigh scattering of visible light the particles must be smaller than 400 to 700 nanometers. Scattering can occur off larger particles, but it will follow a different scattering law.

The Rayleigh scattering law, derived by Lord Rayleigh in 1871, applies to particles smaller than the wavelength of the light being scattered. It states that the percentage of light that will be scattered is inversely proportional to the fourth power of the wavelength. Small particles will scatter a much higher percentage of short wavelength light than long wavelength light. Because the mathematical relationship involves the fourth power of the wavelength even a small wavelength difference can mean a large difference in scattering efficiencies. For example, applying the Rayleigh law to the wavelengths of red and blue light given above shows that small particles will scatter blue light roughly 10 times more efficiently than red light.

Earths atmosphere contains lots of particles: in fact, it is made of particles, namely molecules, dust, and ice crystals or water droplets. The dust and ice particles scatter light but are usually large enough that the Rayleigh scattering law does not apply. However, the nitrogen and oxygen molecules in Earths atmosphere are particles small enough that Rayleigh scattering applies. They scatter blue light about 10 times as much as red light. When the sun is high overhead on a clear day, some of the blue light is scattered. Much of it is scattered more than once before eventually hitting our eyes, so we see blue light coming not directly from the sun but from all over the sky. The sky is then a shade of blue. In the evening, when there is less blue light coming directly from the sun it will appear redder than it really is. What about sunsets? When the Sun is low in the sky, the light must travel through much more atmosphere to reach our eyes. Even more of the blue light is scattered, and the sun appears even redder than when it is overhead. Hence, sunsets and sunrises are red.

See also Color; Electromagnetic spectrum.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Rayleigh Scattering." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Rayleigh Scattering." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rayleigh-scattering-0

"Rayleigh Scattering." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rayleigh-scattering-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Rayleigh Scattering

Rayleigh scattering

Why is the sky blue? Why are sunsets red? The answer involves Rayleigh scattering. When light strikes small particles, it bounces off in a different direction in a process called scattering. Rayleigh scattering is the scattering that occurs when the particles are smaller than the wavelength of the light. Blue light has a wavelength of about 400 nanometers, and red light has a wavelength of about 700 nanometers. Other colors of light are in between. A nanometer is a billionth of a meter. So, for Rayleigh scattering of visible light the particles must be smaller than 400 to 700 nanometers. Scattering can occur off larger particles, but it will follow a different scattering law.

The Rayleigh scattering law, derived by Lord Rayleigh in 1871, applies to particles smaller than the wavelength of the light being scattered. It states that the percentage of light that will be scattered is inversely proportional to the fourth power of the wavelength. Small particles will scatter a much higher percentage of short wavelength light than long wavelength light. Because the mathematical relationship involves the fourth power of the wavelength even a small wavelength difference can mean a large difference in scattering efficiencies. For example, applying the Rayleigh law to the wavelengths of red and blue light given above shows that small particles will scatter blue light roughly 10 times more efficiently than red light.

What does all this have to do with blue skies and sunsets? The earth's atmosphere contains lots of particles. The dust particles scatter light but are often large enough that the Rayleigh scattering law does not apply. However the nitrogen and oxygen molecules in the earth's atmosphere are particles small enough that Rayleigh scattering applies. They scatter blue light about 10 times as much as red light. When the Sun is high overhead on a clear day, some of the blue light is scattered. Much of it is scattered more than once before eventually hitting our eyes, so we see blue light coming not directly from the sun but from all over the sky. The sky is then a pretty shade of Carolina blue. In the evening, when there is less blue light coming directly from the Sun it will appear redder than it really is. What about sunsets? When the sun is low in the sky, the light must travel through much more atmosphere to reach our eyes. Even more of the blue light is scattered, and the Sun appears even redder than when it is overhead. Hence, sunsets and sunrises are red.

See also Color; Electromagnetic spectrum.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Rayleigh Scattering." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Rayleigh Scattering." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rayleigh-scattering

"Rayleigh Scattering." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rayleigh-scattering

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.