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horizon

ho·ri·zon / həˈrīzən/ • n. 1. [usu. in sing.] the line at which the earth's surface and the sky appear to meet: the sun rose above the horizon. ∎  (also apparent or visible horizon) the circular boundary of the part of the earth's surface visible from a particular point, ignoring irregularities and obstructions. ∎  (also celestial horizon) Astron. a great circle of the celestial sphere, the plane of which passes through the center of the earth and is parallel to that of the apparent horizon of a place. 2. (often horizons) the limit of a person's mental perception, experience, or interest: she wanted to leave home and broaden her horizons. 3. Geol. a layer of soil or rock, or a set of strata, with particular characteristics. ∎  Archaeol. a level of an excavated site representing a particular period. PHRASES: on the horizon just imminent or becoming apparent: trouble could be on the horizon.

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horizon

horizon, in astronomy, roughly circular line bounding an observer's view of the surface of the earth where the sky and earth seem to meet. This is the visible horizon. At sea the visible horizon is a perfect circle with the observer at its center, but on land it is irregular due to topographic features. The distance to the horizon varies as the square root of the observer's elevation for small elevations; at four times the height the distance to the horizon is twice as great. The celestial horizon, the principal axis in the altazimuth coordinate system, lies halfway between the observer's zenith and nadir. In geology horizon refers to sedimentary deposits of a certain period, usually marked by characteristic fossils.

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horizon

horizon
1. An informal term used in stratigraphy to denote a plane within a body of strata. This may be at a boundary of lithological change, or commonly the term may refer to a thin, distinctive bed within a lithological unit. See also BIOHORIZON.

2. An interface separating two media with different geophysical properties.

3. In soil, a horizontal layer that can be distinguished from the layers below and (except for the surface layer) above it. Identified by a coding system using a capital letter, sometimes followed by a subscript, such layers are used to diagnose soil types. See SOIL HORIZON.

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horizon

horizon XIV. Late ME. orizon(te), — OF. orizon(te) (mod. horizon) — late L. horīzōn, -ont- — Gr. horízōn, sb. use of prp. of horízein bound, limit, f. hōros boundary, limit. In later OF. and Eng. conformed to the L. nom.
So horizontal pert. to the horizon XVI; parallel to the plane of the horizon XVII. — F. or modL.

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horizon

horizon
1. In stratigraphy, an informal term that denotes a plane within a body of strata. It may be at a boundary of lithological change or is (commonly) a thin, distinctive bed within a lithological unit.

2. An interface separating two media with different properties.

3. See soil horizon.

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horizon

horizon In pedology, a relatively uniform soil layer that lies, at any depth in the soil profile, parallel, or nearly so, with the soil surface, and which is differentiated from adjacent horizons above and below by contrasts in mineral or organic properties.

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horizon

horizonItalian, stallion •cañon, canyon, companion •hellion, rebellion •Kenyan •Melanesian, Micronesian, Polynesian •billion, jillion, million, modillion, multimillion, pillion, septillion, sextillion, squillion, trillion, zillion •minion, opinion, pinion •carillon • slumgullion •bunion, Bunyan, grunion, onion, Runyon •roentgen • damson • Kansan • Tarzan •blazon, brazen, emblazon, liaison, raisin •Spätlesen •reason, season, treason •arisen, grison, imprison, mizzen, prison, risen, uprisen •Pilsen • crimson • malison •benison, denizen •orison • citizen •bedizen, greisen, horizon, kaizen •Stockhausen •chosen, frozen •Lederhosen • poison • Susan •cousin, cozen, dozen •Amazon

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