Skip to main content

United Torah Judaism Party (Yahadut ha-Torah; also known as United Torah List)

UNITED TORAH JUDAISM PARTY (Yahadut ha-Torah; also known as United Torah List)

Israeli parliamentary bloc formed in 1973 by an alliance between several ultra-orthodox religious group, such as Degel ha-Torah, Poʿalei Agudat Israel and Agudat Israel.

After winning five seats in the Knesset, this bloc enabled the religious parties to remain unavoidable partners in Israeli political life, a phenomenon well established in Israel's long history of coalition governments. Confronted with divergences among its members, United Torah Judaism brought them together on the single issue of respect for the status quo by signing an agreement in 1948 between the Israeli government and the religious movements.

On 30 May 1996 the bloc won four seats in the Knesset—occupied by Meir Porush and Shmuel Halpert for Agudat Israel, and Avraham Ravitz and Moshe Gaoni for Degel ha-Torah. Three years later the bloc was renamed United Torah List, and won five seats in the general elections of 17 May 1999, which gave victory to Labor Party leader Ehud Barak. A few weeks later, United Torah List agreed to support the Barak government in exchange for lowering the quota of orthodox students in the army, but on the following 5 September, United Torah List quit the coalition government of Ehud Barak.

After the election of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon in mid-March 2001, United Torah List refused to join a national unity government judging that the posts it was offered were insufficient, but did agree to support it in the Knesset. Led by Avraham Ravitz, United Torah List often joined SHAS, Moriah, and the National Religious Party (NRP) in a bloc known as the Torah Front. In the 2003 elections, United Torah List received 4.3 percent of the vote (five Knesset seats).

SEE ALSO Agudat Israel; Barak, Ehud; Degel ha-Torah; Knesset; Moriah; National Religious Party; Poʿalei Agudat Israel; Sharon, Ariel; SHAS.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"United Torah Judaism Party (Yahadut ha-Torah; also known as United Torah List)." Dictionary of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"United Torah Judaism Party (Yahadut ha-Torah; also known as United Torah List)." Dictionary of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 21, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/politics/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/united-torah-judaism-party-yahadut-ha-torah-also-known-united-torah-list

"United Torah Judaism Party (Yahadut ha-Torah; also known as United Torah List)." Dictionary of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. . Retrieved September 21, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/politics/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/united-torah-judaism-party-yahadut-ha-torah-also-known-united-torah-list

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.