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mandrake

mandrake, or mandragora, or Satan's apple, is the plant Atropa mandragora, a native of Southern Europe. Its mystical and magic properties date back into the mists of time, where aphrodisiac and fertility qualities were accorded to it. Indeed, a reference to the cure of sterility can be found in Genesis 3: 14. In the time of Pliny (23–79 ad), pieces of root were given to patients to chew before surgery. The root, which is rather toxic, has anodyne and soporific properties. In larger amounts it causes delirium and madness. The name ‘Satan's apple’ derives from the yellow fruit, which resembles a small apple, and causes poisoning in cattle when eaten — indeed, the Arab name mandragora means ‘hurtful to cattle’.

It is probable that so-called ‘mystical’ properties were attributed to mandrake mainly because of the form of the parsnip-like root system, which usually divides to give ‘arm and leg’ appendages to a human body form, which can take either female or male characteristics. Many have claimed that the plant shrieks when it is pulled from the ground. Pulling it by hand is considered an ill-advised thing to do. Rather, the plant should be tethered to a dog to pull it out of the ground, for anyone hearing the shriek would certainly perish. The root of the plant was commonly used for its medicinal properties, as an emetic and purgative, and for expelling demons. Mandrake was an important component for lunar rituals and was needed to produce moon water. To do this small pieces of root were placed in a chalice of water and exposed to moonlight each night until the moon became full. Chemical investigation has shown that the plant contains alkaloids — all of which can cause the pupils to dilate, of which the predominant one turns out to be madragorine, shown to be identical to atropine, which is found in belladonna plants. As both plants are from the same family the coincidence is not surprising. In 1526, Peter Treveris, in the Grete Herbal poured scorn on all the mandrake legends, stating ‘all which dreames and old wives tales you shall henceforth caste out your bookes of memories.’ In spite of this early, and undoubtedly correct, denouncement, the tales and myths linger still.

Alan W. Cuthbert

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mandrake

mandrake, plant of the family Solanaceae (nightshade family), the source of a narcotic much used during the Middle Ages as a pain-killer and perhaps the subject of more superstition than any other plant. The true mandrakes are of the genus Mandragora (especially M. officinalis), herbaceous perennials native to the Mediterranean and to Himalayan areas. The long root (sometimes called a mandrake), which crudely resembles the human form, has been credited since ancient times with such attributes as the power to magically arouse ardor, increase wealth, and overcome infertility (e.g., Gen. 30.14–16). It was said that the root gave forth such screams when pulled from the ground that death or madness resulted for any who heard; it was uprooted, therefore, by a dog who was tied to it and then called from a distance. The potency of the mandrake, which contains several alkaloids of medicinal value, has made it one of the most frequently mentioned plants in literature. Also sometimes called mandrake is the May apple (genus Podophyllum) of the Berberidaceae (barberry family), which has important medicinal properties. Mandrake is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Polemoniales, family Solanaceae. The May apple is classified in the order Ranunculales, family Berberidaceae.

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mandrake

mandrake a Mediterranean plant of the nightshade family, with white or purple flowers and large yellow berries. It has a forked fleshy root which supposedly resembles the human form and was formerly widely used in medicine and magic, being thought to promote conception. It was reputed to shriek when pulled from the ground and to cause the death of whoever uprooted it (a dog being therefore traditionally employed for the purpose). Recorded from Middle English, the name comes from medieval Latin mandragora, associated with man (because of the shape of its root) + drake in the Old English sense ‘dragon’.

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mandrake

mandrake Plant of the potato family, native to the Mediterranean region and used since ancient times as a medicine. It contains the alkaloids: hyoscyamine, scopolamin, and mandragorine. Leaves are borne at the base of the stem, and the large greenish-yellow or purple flowers produce a many-seeded berry. Height: 40cm (16in); family Solanaceae; species Mandragora officinarum.

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mandrake

man·drake / ˈmanˌdrāk/ • n. 1. a Mediterranean plant (Mandragora officinarum) of the nightshade family, with white or purple flowers and yellow berries. It has a forked root that supposedly resembles the human form and was formerly used in medicine and magic. 2. another term for mayapple.

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mandrake

mandrake mandragora. XIV. ME also -ag(g)e, prob. — MDu. mandrage, mandragre — medL. MANDRAGORA; alt. to mandrake was prob. in allusion to the man-like form of the root of the plant, and assoc. with DRAKE1 dragon because of the plant's supposed magical properties.

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Mandrake

Mandrake

Plant whose roots often bear an uncanny resemblance to a human form.

(See mandragoras )

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mandrake

mandrakeache, awake, bake, betake, Blake, brake, break, cake, crake, drake, fake, flake, forsake, hake, Jake, lake, make, mistake, opaque, partake, quake, rake, sake, shake, sheikh, slake, snake, splake, stake, steak, strake, take, undertake, wake, wideawake •bellyache • clambake • headache •backache • pancake • teacake •seedcake • beefcake • cheesecake •fishcake • johnnycake • tipsy cake •rock cake • shortcake • oatcake •oilcake • fruitcake • cupcake •pat-a-cake • cornflake • snowflake •rattlesnake • handbrake • mandrake •heartbreak • airbrake • daybreak •jailbreak • canebrake • windbreak •tiebreak • corncrake • outbreak •footbrake • muckrake • earache •firebreak • namesake • keepsake •handshake • milkshake • heartache •beefsteak • sweepstake • stocktake •out-take • uptake • grubstake •wapentake • toothache • seaquake •kittiwake • moonquake • earthquake

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