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sea anemone

sea anemone (ənĕm´ənē´), any of the relatively large, predominantly solitary polyps (see polyp and medusa) of the class Anthozoa, phylum Cnidaria. Unlike the closely related corals, these organisms do not have a skeleton. Sea anemones occur everywhere in the oceans, at all depths, but are particularly abundant in coastal waters. Many are beautifully colored (reds, pinks, yellows) and look like flowers when the oral, or feeding, end, equipped with many extensions called tentacles, is fully open. Some anemones are tiny, but most are from one to several inches (2.5–10 cm) long; the genus Stoichactis in the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia may reach 3 ft (90 cm) in diameter at the expanded oral end. Most sea anemones attach temporarily to submerged objects; a few thrust themselves into the sand or live in furrows; a few are parasitic on other marine organisms. Some anemones feed on small particles, which are caught with the aid of a mucus secretion and moving currents that are set up by the tentacles. Most sea anemones are predaceous, immobilizing their prey with the aid of specialized stinging cells called nematocysts. Metridium is the genus most often studied in classrooms. The burrowing anemone, Cerianthuss, occurs on both Pacific and Atlantic coasts; some may reach nearly 2 ft (60 cm) in length. Sea anemones are classified in the phylum Cnidaria, class Anthozoa, subclass Zoantharia.

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sea anemone

sea anemone Sessile, polyp-type coelenterate animal found in marine pools and along rocky shores. It has a cylindrical body with tentacles around its mouth; the colour varies according to species. Height: to 20cm (8in). Class Anthozoa; genera include Tealia, Anemonia, and Metridium.

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sea anemone

sea a·nem·o·ne • n. a sedentary marine coelenterate (order Actiniaria, class Anthozoa) with a columnar body that bears a ring of stinging tentacles around the mouth.

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sea anemone

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