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bulbul (in zoology, bird)

bulbul (bŏŏl´bŏŏl), bird, common name for members of the family Pycnonotidae, comprising 119 species of medium-sized, dull-colored passerine birds with short necks and wings, native to Africa and S Asia. Bulbuls are famed as songsters and are popular as cage birds in the Middle East; frequently mentioned in Persian poetry, the word bulbul is often mistranslated "nightingale." Bulbuls range in size from 6 in. (15 cm) to about 12 in. (30.5 cm). They inhabit grasslands and shrubby countrysides, from sea level to 10,000 ft (3,050 m) in the Himalayas. A common Asian species, the red-whiskered bulbul, Pycnonotus jocosus, is easily tamed and is popular as a cage bird. Bulbuls feed mainly on fruits and berries and sometimes do crop damage. They build cleverly concealed cup-shaped grass nests, in which the female lays from three to five eggs per clutch. Both parents brood the nestlings. Bulbuls are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Pycnonotidae.

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Pycnonotidae

Pycnonotidae (bulbuls, greenbuls; class Aves, order Passeriformes) A family of medium-sized, grey, brown, and olive birds, which have areas of yellow, red, white, or black. They have short to medium-length, slender, slightly curved bills, hooked or notched in some species, with rounded wings, and fairly long tails. They have rictal bristles, and hair-like neck feathers, and some are crested. They are mainly arboreal, inhabit forests and cultivated areas, feed on fruit and insects, and nest in trees and on the ground. Hypsipetes species (of which there are 20) have longer wings than other bulbuls and some are migratory. Some of the 48 species of Pycnonotus are popular cage birds and P. jocosus (red-whiskered bulbul), which inhabits more open areas and cultivated land, has become successfully established in Australia and N. America. There are 15 genera, comprising about 120 species, found in Africa, southern Asia, the Philippines, and the Moluccas.

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bulbul (in zoology, antelope)

bulbul, antelope: see hartebeest.

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bulbuls

bulbuls See PYCNONOTIDAE.

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Bulbuls

Bulbuls

Bulbuls are about 120 species of medium-sized, perching birds, distributed among 15 genera, and making up the family Pycnonotidae. The most diverse genus is Pycnonotus, with about 50 species. Bulbuls are mostly tropical and subtropical birds, occurring in Africa, Asia, and Southeast Asia. Some relatively northern species are migratory, but most species of bulbuls are local birds.

Bulbuls have rather short, rounded wings, a long tail, small, relatively delicate legs and feet, a small, slender bill, and prominent bristles about the base of the top mandible (these are known as rictal bristles). The body size of bulbuls ranges from 611 in (1528 cm).

The coloration of bulbul species is commonly black or gray, often with reddish markings, and sometimes with a distinctive crest on the top of the head. Male and female birds look very similar, as do juvenile birds, although their coloration is more subdued than that of adults.

Bulbuls build a cup-shaped nest in a bush or tree, and lay two to four eggs. Both parents share in the incubation and care of the young.

Species of bulbuls occur in diverse tropical habitats, but not in deserts. They may occur in dense vegetation in tropical forests or in more open habitats, such as gardens in towns or even city parks. Some species of bulbuls are accomplished singers, and they are among the more pleasing avian vocalists in tropical towns and parks where habitat is available for these birds.

Most species of bulbuls eat small fruits, but they may also feed on insects, particularly when they are raising their young, which require high-protein foods. Both parents feed and care for the young, which typically fledge about two weeks after hatching. During the non-breeding season, bulbuls often occur in mixed-species flocks with other bulbuls, and sometimes with birds of other families.

The black bulbul (Hypsipetes madagascariensis )is a wide-ranging species, occurring in young forests and other disturbed habitats from Madagascar to Southeast Asia. This species has an all-black plumage, but red legs, feet, bill, and eyes.

The red-whiskered bulbul (Pycnonotus jocosus ) is a common and familiar species of open habitats from India, through south China, to mainland Southeast Asia. This distinctively head-crested species has also been introduced to Australia, Mauritius, Fiji, and southern Florida.

The yellow-crowned bulbul (Pycnonotus zeylanicus ) of Malaya, Borneo, Sumatra, and Java is an especially accomplished singer, and is sometimes kept in that region as a caged songbird.

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Bulbuls

Bulbuls

Bulbuls are about 120 species of medium-sized, perching birds , distributed among 15 genera, and making up the family Pyncnontidae. The most diverse genus is Pycnonotus, with about 50 species. Bulbuls are mostly tropical and subtropical birds, occurring in Africa , Asia , and Southeast Asia. Some relatively northern species are migratory, but most species of bulbuls are local birds.

Bulbuls have rather short, rounded wings, a long tail, small, relatively delicate legs and feet, a small, slender bill, and prominent bristles about the base of the top mandible (these are known as rictal bristles). The body size of bulbuls ranges from 6-11 in (15-28 cm).

The coloration of bulbul species is commonly black or grey, often with reddish markings, and sometimes with a distinctive crest on the top of the head. Male and female birds look very similar, as do juvenile birds, although their coloration is more subdued than that of adults.

Bulbuls build a cup-shaped nest in a bush or tree , and lay two to four eggs. Both parents share in the incubation and care of the young.

Species of bulbuls occur in diverse tropical habitats, but not in deserts. They may occur in dense vegetation in tropical forests or in more open habitats, such as gardens in towns or even city parks. Some species of bulbuls are accomplished singers, and they are among the more pleasing avian vocalists in tropical towns and parks where habitat is available for these birds.

Most species of bulbuls eat small fruits , but they may also feed on insects , particularly when they are raising babies, which require high-protein foods. Both parents feed and care for the young, which typically fledge about two weeks after hatching. During the non-breeding season, bulbuls often occur in mixed-species flocks with other bulbuls, and sometimes with birds of other families.

The black bulbul (Hypsipetes madagascariensis) is a wide-ranging species, occurring in young forests and other disturbed habitats from Madagascar to Southeast Asia. This species has an all-black plumage, but red legs, feet, bill, and eyes.

The red-whiskered bulbul (Pycnonotus jocosus) is a common and familiar species of open habitats from India, through south China, to mainland Southeast Asia. This distinctively head-crested species has also been introduced to Australia , Mauritius, Fiji, and southern Florida.

The yellow-crowned bulbul (Pycnonotus zeylanicus) of Malaya, Borneo, Sumatra, and Java is an especially accomplished singer, and is sometimes kept in that region as a caged songbird.

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