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Guggenheim

Guggenheim (gŏŏg´ənhīm), family of American industrialists and philanthropists. Meyer Guggenheim, 1828–1905, b. Aargau canton, Switzerland, emigrated (1847) to the United States, prospered as a retail merchant in Philadelphia, and in time built up a flourishing business importing Swiss embroidery. When nearly 60 he purchased from friends some Colorado mining property. Sensing that sure profits were in processing rather than in mining, he built large smelters in Colorado and Mexico and a refinery at Perth Amboy, N.J. The expansion of the Guggenheim enterprises was accelerated by seven well-trained sons—Isaac, Daniel, Murry, Solomon, Benjamin, Simon, and William—who filled strategic places in the Guggenheim organization. Daniel Guggenheim, 1856–1930, b. Philadelphia, was largely responsible for combining (1901) the Guggenheim interests with the American Smelting and Refining Company, of which he became president. The Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation, devoted to aeronautical research and development, represents his principal philanthropy. His son, Harry Frank Guggenheim, 1890–1971, b. West End, N.J., fought in the two world wars, served in international conferences, was (1929–33) ambassador to Cuba, and was cofounder with his wife of the Long Island newspaper Newsday. Daniel's brother, Simon Guggenheim, 1867–1941, b. Philadelphia, served (1907–13) as U.S. Senator from Colorado. With his wife he established (1925) in memory of their son the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, which grants scores of fellowships annually to scholars, writers, artists, and scientists. Another brother of Daniel, Solomon Robert Guggenheim, 1861–1949, b. Philadelphia, established a foundation to increase public appreciation of modern art. The foundation created (1937) in New York City the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum for modern art.

See H. O'Conner, The Guggenheims (1937).

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Guggenheim

Guggenheim US family of industrialists and philanthropists. Meyer Guggenheim (1828–1905), b. Switzerland, immigrated to Philadelphia (1847) and prospered in the lace import business. He bought silver and lead mines in Colorado. He retired leaving control of his enterprises to his seven living sons. Daniel Guggenheim (1856–1930) took the leading role in expanding the family businesses. A prominent philanthropist, he established the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation. Solomon R. Guggenheim (1861–1949) endowed a foundation to foster non-objective art: the Guggenheim Museum opened in New York City in 1959. Simon Guggenheim (1867–1941) was a US senator. In memory of his son, he established the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Harry Frank Guggenheim (1890–1971) was US ambassador to Cuba (1929–33). Peggy Guggenheim (1898–1979) was a patron and collector of modern art.

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Guggenheim

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Guggenheim

GUGGENHEIM

GUGGENHEIM , U.S. family. meyer guggenheim (1828–1905), merchant and industrialist, was the progenitor of the American branch of the family. He was born in Lengnau, Switzerland, and immigrated to the United States in 1848 with his father Simon, settling in Philadelphia. After a period of peddling, Meyer established successful stove polish, lye, and lace-embroidery businesses. In the late 1870s he purchased an interest in the Leadville mines in Colorado. Leaving the embroidery business, the firm of M. Guggenheim's Sons rapidly acquired and built silver, lead, and copper mines and smelters in the western United States, Mexico, and other countries. In 1901 the firm merged with the American Smelting and Refining Company, in which the Guggenheims played a dominant role. At the height of the family's fortune, the company was estimated to be worth over $500,000,000. Meyer's seven sons continued the family's business operations as Guggenheim Brothers, expanding their holdings from Alaska to the Congo.

His eldest son, ISAAC (1854–1922), was born in Philadelphia. He promoted the family's enterprises, including the Guggenheim Exploration Company. He was a contributor to the New York Federation of Jewish Charities, Jewish Theological Seminary, and Hebrew Union College. Meyer's second son, DANIEL (1856–1930), became the leader of the Guggenheim Brothers' far-flung enterprises and was responsible for expansion and modernization. As president of American Smelting and Refining Company for nearly 20 years, he developed tin mines in Bolivia, diamonds in Africa, and nitrates in Chile. A progressive in labor relations, Daniel favored unionization and government economic legislation. With his brother Murry he endowed free music concerts in New York's Central Park; the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation; and the Daniel Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of Aeronautics. He was a trustee of New York's Temple Emanu-El and one of the founders of the Jewish Theological Seminary. Meyer's third son, murry (1858–1939), participated actively in managing Guggenheim Brothers and the American Smelting and Refining Company. His philanthropies included a free dental clinic in New York. The fourth son, solomon robert (1861–1949), developed the family's interests in Mexican and Chilean mining. A benefactor of New York's Mt. Sinai and Montefiore Hospitals and the New York Public School Athletic League, he formed the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, which encouraged nonobjective art. The Guggenheim Museum in New York, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, commemorates this interest. A fifth son, benjamin (1865–1912), entered the family mining business and then withdrew from the partnership in 1900 to head International Steam Pump. He died in the sinking of the Titanic. Meyer's sixth son, SIMON (1867–1941), was associated with the family's mining interests and, from 1907 to 1913, served as U.S. senator from Colorado. In 1925 he established the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, which has provided fellowships to thousands of scholars, scientists, and artists. The seventh son, william (1868–1941), managed company property until 1900, and then withdrew from the family firm. His subsequent activities were public affairs, writing, and philanthropy.

Daniel's son harry frank (1890–1971) served the family's mining enterprises and was senior partner of Guggenheim Brothers. As president of the Daniel Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of Aeronautics from its inception in 1926, he did much to advance aviation. He established the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, which supports scholarly research on problems of aggression, and violence. From 1929 to 1933 he served as United States ambassador to Cuba, and later founded and was president of the Long Island daily Newsday. Benjamin's daughter, marguerite (Peggy; 1898–1979), spent most of her life in Europe, aiding the modern art movement, especially American abstract expressionism. Her home in Venice was a center for art display. In 1979 her memoir, Out of This Century: Confessions of an Art Addict, was published.

bibliography:

H. O'Connor, Guggenheims: The Making of an American Dynasty (1937); M. Lomask, Seed Money (1964); E.P. Hoyt, The Guggenheims and the American Dream (1967). add. bibliography: R. Hallion, Legacy of Flight: The Guggenheim Contribution to American Aviation (1977); J. Davis, The Guggenheims: An American

Epic (1978); J. Weld, Peggy: The Wayward Guggenheim (1986); A. Gill, Art Lover: A Biography of Peggy Guggenheim (2003).

[Morton Rosenstock]

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