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Johnston, Samuel

Samuel Johnston, 1733–1816, political leader in the American Revolution, b. Dundee, Scotland. He emigrated as a child to North Carolina, where his uncle, Gabriel Johnston, was royal governor. After being admitted to the bar, he was a member of the colonial assembly (1759–75) and of its standing Committee of Correspondence after 1773. He was elected to the four provincial congresses (1774–76), presiding at the third and at the fourth, which passed the Halifax Resolves declaring for independence of the colonies; served in the new state senate; and represented North Carolina in the Continental Congress (1780–82). Johnston was governor of North Carolina (1787–89) and presided over the convention that rejected the U.S. Constitution (1788) and over the one (1789) at which North Carolina finally ratified it. He was one of the state's first U.S. Senators (1789–93), a judge of the superior court (1800–1803), and one of the first trustees of the Univ. of North Carolina.

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Abbey theatre

Abbey theatre. First permanent home of the Irish National Theatre, founded by Lady Gregory, Edward Martyn, and W. B. Yeats to foster native drama. Yeats's verse play On Baile's Strand was the opening production in 1904 but more dramatic scenes came four years later with riots at the first night of J. M. Synge's The Playboy of the Western World. Controversy also surrounded the staging of plays by Shaw and O'Casey, though the latter's The Shadow of a Gunman marked a decisive shift from Celtic twilight to Dublin tenement. The original building, on the corner of Abbey Street, was destroyed by fire in 1951.

John Saunders

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