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Decadence

161. Decadence

  1. Buddenbrooks portrays the downfall of a materialistic society. [Ger. Lit.: Buddenbrooks ]
  2. cherry orchard focal point of the declining Ranevsky estate. [Russ. Drama: Chekhov The Cherry Orchard in Magill II, 144]
  3. Diver, Dick dissatisfied psychiatrist goes downhill on alcohol. [Am. Lit.: Tender is the Night ]
  4. Gray, Dorian beautiful youth whose hedonism leads to vice and depravity. [Br. Lit.: Oscar Wilde The Picture of Dorian Gray ]
  5. Great Gatsby, The 1925 novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald symbolizes corruption and decadence. [Am. Lit.: The Great Gatsby ]
  6. House of Usher eerie, decayed mansion collapses as master dies. [Am. Lit.: Fall of the House of Usher in Tales of Terror ]
  7. Lonigan, Studs Chicago Irishman whose life is one of physical and moral deterioration (1935). [Am. Lit.: Studs Lonigan: A Trilogy, Magill III, 10281030]
  8. Manhattan Transfer novel portraying the teeming greed of the citys inhabitants. [Am. Lit.: Manhattan Transfer ]
  9. Nana indictment of social decay during Napoleon IIIs reign (1860s). [Fr. Lit.: Nana, Magill I, 638640]
  10. Remembrance of Things Past records the decay of a society. [Fr. Lit.: Haydn & Fuller, 630]
  11. Satyricon novel by Petronius depicting social excesses in imperial Rome. [Rom. Lit.: Magill II, 938]
  12. Sun Also Rises, The moral collapse of expatriots. [Am. Lit.: The Sun Also Rises ]
  13. Sound and the Fury, The Faulkner novel about an old Southern family gone to seed: victims of lust, incest, suicide, and idiocy. [Am. Lit.: Magill I, 917]
  14. Warren, The Haredales house, mouldering to ruin. [Br. Lit.: Barnaby Rudge ]
  15. Yoknapatawpha County northern Mississippi; decadent setting for Faulkners novels. [Am. Lit.: Hart, 955]

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decadence

dec·a·dence / ˈdekədəns/ • n. moral or cultural decline, esp. after a peak or culmination of achievement. ∎  behavior reflecting such a decline. ∎  luxurious self-indulgence.

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decadence

decadence XVI. — F. décadence — medL. dēcadentia, f. dēcadēre DECAY.
So decadent XIX.

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