nymph (mythology)

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nymph / nimf/ • n. 1. a mythological spirit of nature imagined as a beautiful maiden inhabiting rivers, woods, or other locations. ∎ chiefly poetic/lit. a beautiful young woman. 2. an immature form of an insect that does not change greatly as it grows, e.g., a dragonfly, mayfly, or locust. Compare with larva. ∎  an artificial fly made to resemble the aquatic nymph of an insect, used in fishing. 3. a mainly brown butterfly (subfamily Satyrinae, family Nymphalidae) that frequents woods and forest glades. DERIVATIVES: nymph·al / ˈnimfəl/ adj. nym·phe·an / ˈnimfēən/ adj. nymph·like / -līk/ adj. ORIGIN: late Middle English: from Old French nimphe, from Latin nympha, from Greek numphē ‘nymph, bride.’

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472. Nymph

  1. Atlantides (Pleiades ) seven daughters of Atlas by Pleione. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 37]
  2. Camenae fountain nymphs; identified with Greek Muses. [Rom. Myth.: Zimmerman, 49]
  3. dryads divine maidens of the woods. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 108]
  4. hamadryads wood nymphs. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 113]
  5. Hyades seven daughters of Atlas, entrusted with the care of the infant Dionysus. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 134]
  6. limoniads nymphs of meadows and flowers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 152]
  7. naiads divine maidens of lakes, streams, and fountains. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 256]
  8. Napaeae nymphs of woodland glens and vales. [Rom. Myth.: Howe, 174]
  9. Nereids sea nymphs of the Mediterranean. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 257]
  10. Oceanids sea nymphs of the great oceans. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 263]
  11. oreads divine maidens of the mountains. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 270]

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nymph The juvenile stage of exopterygote insects, especially terrestrial species, such as grasshoppers, cockroaches, and earwigs; the juveniles of aquatic species (e.g. dragonflies, mayflies, stoneflies) are sometimes called naiads or larvae. The nymph resembles the adult except that the wings and reproductive organs are undeveloped. There is no pupal stage, the nymph developing directly into the adult. Compare larva.

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nymph a mythological spirit of nature imagined as a beautiful maiden inhabiting rivers, woods, or other locations. Recorded from late Middle English, the word comes via Old French and Latin from Greek numphē ‘nymph, bride’, and is related to Latin nubere ‘be the wife of’.

In literary use from the early 17th century, nymph may be used for a river or stream.
nymphaeum a grotto or shrine dedicated to a nymph or nymphs; a building or part of a building built to represent such a shrine.

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nymph Young insect of primitive orders that do not undergo complete metamorphosis. The term designates all immature stages after the egg. The nymph resembles the adult and does so more closely with each moulting. Examples are the aquatic nymphs of dragonflies, mayflies, and damsel flies.

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nymph (myth.) semi-divine female being XIV; young beautiful woman; pupa XVI. — OF. nimphe (mod. nymphe) — L. nympha — Gr. nūmphé bride, nymph, rel. to L. nūbere marry. comb. form nympho-, as in nympholepsy, nymphomania XVIII.

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nymph •Kulturkampf •lymph, nymph •Arc de Triomphe • oomph •bumf, galumph, harrumph, humph •triumph

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nymph In Greek mythology, a female nature spirit who was said to be a guardian of natural objects. Nymphs were identified with specific locations, often with trees and water.

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nymph
1. A crescent-shaped platform, present in certain bivalves, to which the ligament is attached.

2. See LARVA.