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print / print/ • v. [tr.] (often be printed) 1. produce (books, newspapers, magazines, etc.), esp. in large quantities, by a mechanical process involving the transfer of text, images, or designs to paper: a thousand copies of the book were printed. ∎  produce (text or a picture) in such a way: the words had been printed in blue type. ∎  (of a newspaper or magazine) publish (a piece of writing) within its pages: the article was printed in the first edition. ∎  (of a publisher or printer) arrange for (a book, manuscript, etc.) to be reproduced in large quantities: Harper printed her memoirs in 1930. ∎  produce a paper copy of (information stored on a computer): the results of a search can be printed out. ∎  send (a computer file) to a printer or to another, temporary file. ∎  produce (a photographic print) from a negative: any make of film can be developed and printed. ∎  write (text) clearly without joining the letters: print your name and address on the back of the check | [intr.] it will be easier to read if I print. 2. mark (a surface, typically a textile or a garment) with a colored design or pattern: a delicate fabric printed with roses. ∎  make (a mark or indentation) on a surface or in a soft substance by pressing something onto it: he printed a mark on her soft skin. ∎  mark or indent (the surface of a soft substance) in such a way: we printed the butter with carved wooden butter molds. ∎ fig. fix (something) firmly or indelibly in someone's mind: his face, with its clearly drawn features, was printed on her memory. • n. 1. the text appearing in a book, newspaper, or other printed publication, esp. with reference to its size, form, or style: squinting at the tiny print bold print. ∎  the state of being available in published form: the news will never get into print. ∎  a newspaper or magazine: [as adj.] the print media. ∎  [as adj.] of or relating to the printing industry or the printed media: the print unions a print worker. 2. an indentation or mark left on a surface or soft substance by pressure, esp. that of a foot or hand: there were paw prints everywhere. ∎  (prints) fingerprints: the FBI matched the prints to those of the Las Vegas drug suspect. 3. a picture or design printed from a block or plate or copied from a painting by photography: the walls were hung with wildlife prints. ∎  a photograph printed on paper from a negative or transparency. ∎  a copy of a motion picture on film, esp. a particular version of it. 4. a piece of fabric or clothing with a decorative colored pattern or design printed on it: light summer prints ∎  such a pattern or design. PHRASES: appear in print (of an author) have one's work published. in print 1. (of a book) available from the publisher: he was surprised to find it was still in print. 2. in printed or published form: she did not live to see her work in print. out of print (of a book) no longer available from the publisher: the title I want is out of print. the printed word language or ideas as expressed in books, newspapers, or other publications, esp. when contrasted with their expression in speech.

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"print." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"print." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 19, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/print-1

"print." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved February 19, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/print-1

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print

print impression, impress XIII; (typographical uses) XV. ME. priente(e), preint(e), pre(e)nt(e), later print(e) — OF. priente, preinte, sb. use of fem. pp. of preindre :— L. premere PRESS1.
Hence print vb. impress, stamp XIV; (in typographical uses) XVI. printer XVI.

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"print." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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print

printacquaint, ain't, attaint, complaint, constraint, distraint, faint, feint, paint, plaint, quaint, restraint, saint, taint •spray-paint • greasepaint • warpaint •asquint, bint, clint, dint, flint, glint, hint, imprint, lint, mint, misprint, print, quint, skint, splint, sprint, squint, stint, tint •Septuagint • skinflint • catmint •varmint • spearmint • calamint •peppermint • enprint • screen print •offprint • blueprint • newsprint •footprint • thumbprint • fingerprint •monotint • mezzotint • aquatint •pint • Geraint •Comte, conte, font, fount, pont, quant, Vermont, want •Delfont • vicomte • Frémont •piedmont • Beaumont • Hellespont •passant • poste restante •avaunt, daunt, flaunt, gaunt, haunt, jaunt, taunt, vaunt

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