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architrave

architrave.
1. Essentially a formalized beam or lintel, it is the lowest of the three main parts of an entablature, itself often divided into fasciae.

2. Antepagmentum consisting of plain or elaborate mouldings framing a doorway, niche, panel, window-aperture, or other opening, properly with the same section and number of fasciae as on an entablature architrave. If the vertical mouldings of the architrave turn outwards horizontally as though at the ends of a lintel, then turn vertically, then run horizontally again across the top of the opening, they comprise an eared, or lugged, architrave; and if the vertical mouldings turn outwards horizontally, again as though at the ends of a lintel, then turn vertically, then run horizontally for a distance equal to the short vertical run, then drop vertically, then run horizontally along the top, they comprise a shouldered architrave, and the projecting shoulders are called crossettes. Architraves often stop against an architrave-, plinth-, or skirting-block against which a plinth or skirting also stops. An architrave narrower at the top than at the bottom, i.e. with battered sides, is called a Vitruvian opening.

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architrave

architrave (är´kĬtrāv), in architecture, principal beam and lowest member of the classical entablature, the other main members of which are the frieze and the cornice. Its position is directly above the columns, and it extends between them, thus carrying the upper members of the order (see orders of architecture). The term also applies to molding around the sides and top of a door or window frame.

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architrave

ar·chi·trave / ˈärkiˌtrāv/ • n. 1. (in classical architecture) a main beam resting across the tops of columns, specifically the lower third entablature. 2. the molded frame around a doorway or window. ∎  a molding around the exterior of an arch.

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architrave

architrave XVI. — F. — It., f. ARCHI- + trave beam :- L. trabs, trabe-.

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architrave

architravebehave, brave, Cave, clave, concave, crave, Dave, deprave, engrave, enslave, fave, forgave, gave, grave, knave, lave, Maeve, misbehave, misgave, nave, outbrave, pave, rave, save, shave, shortwave, slave, stave, they've, waive, wave •enclave • exclave • conclave •Redgrave • architrave • Wargrave •Palgrave • palsgrave • aftershave •brainwave • heatwave • microwave

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