Skip to main content

this

this / [voicedth]is/ • pron. (pl. these / [voicedth]ēz/ ) 1. used to identify a specific person or thing close at hand or being indicated or experienced: is this your bag? he soon knew that this was not the place for him. ∎  used to introduce someone or something: this is the captain speaking listen to this. ∎  referring to the nearer of two things close to the speaker (the other, if specified, being identified by “that”): this is different from that. 2. referring to a specific thing or situation just mentioned: the company was transformed, and Ward had played a vital role in bringing this about. • adj. (pl. these ) 1. used to identify a specific person or thing close at hand or being indicated or experienced: don't listen to this guy these croissants are delicious. ∎  referring to the nearer of two things close to the speaker (the other, if specified, being identified by “that”): this one or that one? 2. referring to a specific thing or situation just mentioned: there was a court case resulting from this incident. 3. used with periods of time related to the present: I thought you were busy all this week how are you this morning? ∎  referring to a period of time that has just passed: I haven't left my bed these three days. 4. inf. used (chiefly in narrative) to refer to a person or thing previously unspecified: I turned around, and there was this big mummy standing next to us! I've got this problem and I need help. • adv. to the degree or extent indicated: they can't handle a job this big he's not used to this much attention. PHRASES: this and that (or this, that, and the other) inf. various unspecified things: they stayed up chatting about this and that. this here inf. used to draw attention emphatically to someone or something: I've slept in this here bed for forty years.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"this." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"this." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/this-0

"this." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/this-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.