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Forgetfulness

278. Forgetfulness (See also Carelessness.)

  1. Absent-Minded Beggar, The ballad of forgetful soldiers who fought in the Boer War. [Br. Lit.: The Absent-Minded Beg-gars in Payton, 3]
  2. absent-minded professor personification of one too contemplative to execute practical tasks. [Pop. Culture: Misc.]
  3. jujube causes loss of memory and desire to return home. [Classical Myth.: Leach, 561562]
  4. Lethe river of Hades which induced forgetfulness. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 687; Br. Lit.: Paradise Lost ; Rom. Lit.: Aeneid ]
  5. limbo place or condition of neglect and inattention (from Dante). [Western Folklore: Espy, 124]
  6. Lotophagi African people, eaters of an amnesia-inducing fruit. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey ; Br. Lit.: The Lotus-Eaters in Norton, 733736]
  7. Madison, Percival Wemys character who no longer remembers his name. [Br. Lit.: Lord of the Flies ]
  8. soma drug that induces forgetfulness. [Br. Lit.: Brave New World ]
  9. Winkle, Rip Van awakening from 20 years sleep, forgets how things have changed. [Am. Lit.: Sketch Book, Payton, 574]

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