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Schwartz, Julius 1907-

SCHWARTZ, Julius 1907-

PERSONAL: Born 1907.

ADDRESSES: Office—c/o Whittlesey House/McGraw Hill, 1221 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10001.

CAREER: Science teacher and author. New York City public schools, science teacher; Bank Street College of Education, New York, NY, instructor in science education; Bureau of Curriculum Research for New York City schools and Midwest Program on Airborn Television Instruction, science consultant.

AWARDS, HONORS: Honorable mention, New York Academy of Sciences Children's Book Award, 1974, for It's Fun to Know Why: Experiments with Things around us.

WRITINGS:

FOR CHILDREN; EXCEPT AS NOTED

Adventures in Biology, New York Association of Biology Teachers (Brooklyn, NY), 1940.

It's Fun to Know Why: Experiments with Things around Us, illustrations by Edwin Herron, Whittlesey House (New York, NY), 1952, second edition, illustrations by Herron and Anne Marie Jauss, McGraw-Hill (New York, NY), 1973.

Through the Magnifying Glass: Little Things That Make a Big Difference, illustrations by Jeanne Bendick, Whittlesey House (New York, NY), 1954.

Now I Know, illustrations by Marc Simont, Whittlesey House (New York, NY), 1955.

I Know a Magic House, illustrations by Marc Simont, Whittlesey House (New York, NY), 1956.

(With Glenn O. Blough) Elementary School Science and How to Teach It (adult), revised edition (Schwartz was not associated with original edition), Holt, Rinehart, and Winston (New York, NY), 1958, sixth edition, 1979.

(Compiler with Herman Schneider) Growing up with Science, [New York], 1959, second edition, compiled with Susan A. Kailin, Bowker (New York, NY), 1967.

The Earth Is Your Spaceship, illustrations by Marc Simont, Whittlesey House (New York, NY), 1963.

Uphill and Downhill, illustrations by William McCaffrey, Whittlesey House (New York, NY), 1965.

Go on Wheels, illustrations by Arnold Roth, McGraw-Hill (New York, NY), 1966.

Magnify and Find out Why, illustrations by Richard Cuffari, McGraw-Hill (New York, NY), 1972.

Earthwatch: Space-Time Investigations with a Globe, illustrations by Radu Vero, McGraw-Hill (New York, NY), 1977.

SIDELIGHTS: Julius Schwartz is a former science teacher who writes to explain basic scientific concepts to children. His books have addressed a wide variety of topics of interest to children, namely, the earth's orbit, wheels, inventions (including water faucets and phonographs), the sound of the wind, electric shocks, magnifying lenses, and time-space investigations. His book Earthwatch: Space-Time Investigations with a Globe includes illustrations and experiments that help explain how Earth and its satellites move. It's Fun to Know Why teaches children scientific facts about everyday materials, such as iron and plastic, and Magnify and Find out Why, explains how to use a magnifying glass to learn more about things invisible to the naked eye.

Alice Dalgliesh in the Saturday Review felt that Schwartz's works capture the imagination of a child. For example, the author explains the earth's orbit with references to birthdays instead of ordinary, calendar days. Most of Schwartz's books are hands-on and contain experiments for children to try at home or in the classroom.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

New York Herald Tribune Books, May 16, 1954; May 12, 1963.

New York Times, June 6, 1954; November 11, 1956.

Saturday Review, May 15, 1954; November 17, 1956; May 11, 1963.

Scientific American, December, 1977.

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