Rusch, Kristine Kathryn 1960- (Kristine Grayson, Kris Nelscott, Kris Rusch, Sandy Schofield, Kathryn Wesley)

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Rusch, Kristine Kathryn 1960- (Kristine Grayson, Kris Nelscott, Kris Rusch, Sandy Schofield, Kathryn Wesley)

PERSONAL:

Born June 4, 1960, in Oneonta, NY; daughter of Carroll E. (a math professor) and Marian M. (a homemaker) Rusch; married Randall Thompson (divorced, 1986); married Dean Wesley Smith (a writer), December 20, 1992. Education: University of Wisconsin, B.A., 1982; graduate of the Clarion Writers Workshop, Michigan State University, 1985. Hobbies and other interests: History, music, film, theater, needlework.

ADDRESSES:

Home—Lincoln City, OR. Agent—Merrilee Heifetz, Writers House, 21 W. 26th St., New York, NY 10010. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Freelance journalist, 1978-86; WORT Radio, Madison, WI, reporter, 1980-86, and news director, 1983-86; Shire Frame Shop & Galleries, owner, 1981-84; freelance author, 1982—, William C. Brown Publishers, editorial assistant, 1984; secretary in Eugene, OR, 1986-89; Pulphouse Publishing, Eugene, OR, founder, with Dean Wesley Smith, 1987.

AWARDS, HONORS:

World Fantasy Award (with Dean Wesley Smith), 1989, for work with Pulphouse Publishing; John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, 1990; Locus Award for Best Nonfiction (with Dean Wesley Smith), 1991, for Science Fiction Writers of America Handbook: The Professional Writer's Guide to Writing Professionally; Locus and Homer Awards for best novella, both 1992, both for Gallery of His Dreams; Hugo Award for best editor, 1994; Homer Award for Best Novelette and Readers Choice Award, Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, both 1998, both for Echea; Readers Choice Award, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, 1998, for Details; Readers Choice Award, Science Fiction Age, 1998, for Coolhunting; Herodotus Award for Best U.S. Historical Mystery, 2000, for A Dangerous Road; Hugo Award for best novelette, 2001, for Millennium Babies; Deadly Pleasures Best Books of 2001 citation, for Smoke-Filled Rooms; Reviewers Choice, Romantic Times, 2000, for Utterly Charming, and 2001, for Thoroughly Kissed; Endeavor Award, 2003, for The Disappeared.

WRITINGS:

The White Mists of Power (novel), Roc (New York, NY), 1991.

The Gallery of His Dreams (novella), Axolotl Press (Eugene, OR), 1991, reprinted in The Year's Best Science Fiction: Ninth Annual Collection, edited by Gardner Dozois, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1992.

(With Kevin J. Anderson) Afterimage (novel), Roc (New York, NY), 1992.

Traitors (novel), Roc (New York, NY), 1993.

Heart Readers (novel), Roc (New York, NY), 1993.

Facade (novel), Dell Abyss (New York, NY), 1993.

Alien Influences (novel), Millennium (England), 1994, Bantam Spectra (New York, NY), 1997.

(Editor, with Edward L. Ferman) The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: A 45th Anniversary Anthology, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1994.

Sins of the Blood (novel), Dell (New York, NY), 1994.

The Devil's Churn (novel), Dell (New York, NY), 1996.

Star Wars: The New Rebellion (novel), Bantam (New York, NY), 1996.

(Compiler) Star Wars Diplomatic Corps Entrance Exam, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Kevin J. Anderson) Afterimage/Aftershock, Meisha Merlin (Decatur, GA), 1998.

(As Kris Rusch) Hitler's Angel (novel), St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1998.

(Under pseudonym Sandy Schofield) Predator: Big Game, Spectra (Dillon, CO), 1999.

Black Throne: The Black Queen, Bantam (New York, NY), 1999.

The Black King, Bantam (New York, NY), 2000.

(As Kathryn Wesley) The 10th Kingdom (based on a screenplay written by Simon Moore), Hallmark Entertainment Books (New York, NY), 2000.

In the Shade of the Slowboat Man (radio script; adapted from Dean Wesley Smith's story of the same title), produced by Seeing Ear Theatre, 2000.

Coolhunting (e-book), Fictionwise.com, 2001.

Stories for an Enchanted Afternoon, foreword by Kevin J. Anderson, Golden Gryphon Press (Urbana, IL), 2001.

Little Miracles and Other Tales of Murder, Five Star (Waterville, ME), 2001.

(Under pseudonym Kathryn Wesley) The Monkey King (novelization), Kensington (New York, NY), 2001.

(As Kathryn Wesley) Swept Away (based on a screenplay written by Guy Ritchie), Pocket Books (New York, NY), 2002.

The Retrieval Artist, and Other Stories, Five Star (Waterville, ME), 2002.

Fantasy Life, Pocket Star Books (New York, NY), 2003.

(As Kathryn Wesley) Salem Witch Trials, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 2003.

Also author of Millennium Babies (novella); author, with Dean Wesley Smith, of Klingon! script for computer game, produced in 1996. Editor of Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine, 1987-91; editor of Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, 1991-97; contributor to books by others; work represented in anthologies and collections; contributor of short stories to periodicals, including Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Analog Science Fiction, Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Science Fiction Age, and Amazing Stories. Author of several booklets about writing style.

"RETRIEVAL ARTIST" SERIES

The Disappeared, Roc (New York, NY), 2002.

Extremes, Roc (New York, NY), 2003.

Consequences, Roc (New York, NY), 2004.

Buried Deep, Roc (New York, NY), 2005.

WITH HUSBAND, DEAN WESLEY SMITH

(Editor) Science Fiction Writers of America Handbook: The Professional Writer's Guide to Writing Professionally, Writers Notebook Press (Eugene, OR), 1990.

(Under pseudonym Sandy Schofield) Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Big Game (novel), Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1993.

Star Trek: Voyager: The Escape (novel), Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1995.

(Under pseudonym Sandy Schofield) Aliens: Rogue (novel), Bantam/Dark Horse (New York, NY), 1995.

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Long Night (novel), Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1996.

Star Trek: Klingon! (novel), Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1996.

Klingon Immersion Studies (CD-ROM), Simon & Schuster Interactive (New York, NY), 1996.

Star Trek: Rings of Tautee (novel), Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1996.

Star Trek: The Next Generation: Invasion! Soldiers of Fear (novel), Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1996.

(Under pseudonym Sandy Schofield) Quantum Leap: The Loch Ness Monster (novel), Ace (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Nina Kiriki Hoffman) Star Trek: Voyager: Echoes (novel), Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1997.

Star Trek: Day of Honor—Book Four (novel) Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1997.

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine; The Mist: The Captain's Table (novel), Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1998.

Double Helix: Vectors, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1999.

The Tenth Planet, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1999.

The Tenth Planet: Oblivion, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 2000.

X Men, Ballantine (New York, NY), 2000.

Star Trek: Thin Air, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 2000.

The Tenth Planet: Final Assault, Ballantine (New York, NY), 2000.

Star Trek Voyager: Shadow, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 2001.

Roswell: No Good Deed, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 2001.

Roswell: Little Green Men, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 2002.

Star Trek Enterprise: By the Book, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 2002.

"FEY SERIES"

The Sacrifice: The First Book of the Fey, Bantam (New York, NY), 1996.

The Fey: The Rival, Bantam (New York, NY), 1997.

The Fey: The Resistance, Bantam (New York, NY), 1998.

Victory: The Final Book of the Fey, Bantam (New York, NY), 1998.

UNDER PSEUDONYM KRISTINE GRAYSON

Utterly Charming, Zebra Books (New York, NY), 2000.

Thoroughly Kissed, Zebra Books (New York, NY), 2001.

Completely Smitten, Zebra Books (New York, NY), 2002.

Simply Irresistible, Zebra Books (New York, NY), 2003.

Absolutely Captivated, Zebra Books (New York, NY), 2004.

Totally Spellbound, Zebra Books (New York, NY), 2005.

"SMOKEY DALTON" SERIES; UNDER PSEUDONYM KRIS NELSCOTT

A Dangerous Road, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2000.

Smoke-Filled Rooms, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2001.

Thin Walls, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2002.

Stone Cribs, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2004.

War at Home, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2005.

Days of Rage, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2006.

"STAR TREK VOYAGER COMIC BOOK SERIES"

Encounters with the Unknown, Wildstorm Productions, 2001.

Planet Killer: Book One, Wildstorm Productions, 2001.

Planet Killer: Book Two, Wildstorm Productions, 2001.

Planet Killer: Book Three, Wildstorm Productions, 2001.

EDITOR; PULPHOUSE ANTHOLOGIES

Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine, Issues One and Two, Pulphouse Publishing (Eugene, OR), 1988.

Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine, Issues Three, Four and Five, Pulphouse Publishing (Eugene, OR), 1989.

Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine, Issues Six, Seven, Eight and Nine, Pulphouse Publishing (Eugene, OR), 1990.

Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine, Issues Ten and Eleven, Pulphouse Publishing (Eugene, OR), 1991.

The Best of Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1991.

Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine, Issue Twelve, Pulphouse Publishing (Eugene, OR), 1992.

ADAPTATIONS:

Star Trek: Klingon! was adapted for audio, Simon & Schuster Audio (New York, NY), 1996.

SIDELIGHTS:

A prolific and popular writer, Kristine Kathryn Rusch has had a great deal of influence on the genres of science fiction and fantasy writing toward the end of the twentieth century. "In less than a decade," notes Sydonie Benet in St. James Guide to Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers, "she has risen from relative obscurity to a highly regarded presence as both an editor and an author."

The daughter of a college math professor, Rusch grew up in a literate home; two of her elder siblings became English professors. Rusch took the route of a writer instead, with stops in radio, retail, and office work. At age twenty-six Rusch completed the prestigious Clarion Science Fiction Workshop and an experimental writing course in Taos, New Mexico. In 1987 she published her first story, in Aboriginal Science Fiction, but more importantly, with Dean Wesley Smith, she cofounded Pulphouse Publishing.

For many years, Pulphouse's primary project was the publication of Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine, a book-length anthology that came out quarterly. They also published other projects within or about the speculative fiction field, including a collaboration between Rusch and Smith on the nonfiction Science Fiction Writers of America Handbook: The Professional Writer's Guide to Writing Professionally, which garnered them an award from Locus magazine. After Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine went on hiatus—to return briefly in the mid-1990s in a more conventional magazine format—Rusch served as the editor of another popular outlet for speculative fiction, the Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, until the middle of 1997. In 1991, she published her first full-length novel, The White Mists of Power. Since then, Rusch has penned many other novels and edited several anthologies.

In the same year that Rusch won Best New Writer acclaim, Pulphouse published her novella The Gallery of His Dreams. This tale, some eighty pages in length, concerns the historical figure Mathew Brady, famed for his photographic record of the U.S. Civil War. In his dreams, Brady travels through time to photograph the horrors of more modern wars, such as the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan, and the massacre at My Lai in Vietnam. Tom Easton, reviewing The Gallery of His Dreams in Analog Science Fiction & Fact, observed that Rusch "is quite explicit in contrasting Brady's vision of his work as the production of cautionary documents with the visions of his contemporaries, of his photographs of death and destruction as commercial commodities … of those photographs as art." In the same article, Easton also reviewed The Best of Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine, an anthology which Rusch edited during roughly the same period. He described it as "good stuff, the best of a good series. Often outrageous and provocative. Always interesting." Edward Bryant in the Bloomsbury Review labeled it "a fine anthology." In a previous issue of Analog, Easton described Rusch's nonfiction collaboration with Smith, Science Fiction Writers of America Handbook, as "thorough, useful discussions" of issues pertaining to writers in the genre.

In The White Mists of Power, readers become acquainted with Bard Byron, who is really the long-lost prince of Kilot, and his traveling companion Seymour, an inexpert magician. War in Kilot between the upper and lower classes is predicted by the magical being Cache Enos, but young Byron has a plan to preserve his country despite the fact that his father, the king, dies before Byron can be identified as the true prince. Voice of Youth Advocates reviewer Denice Thornhill wrote: "I just loved this book and have raved about it to several people." She went on to note the story's "good characters that grow," and called it "a must buy." A Publishers Weekly reviewer liked The White Mists of Power as well, citing Rusch's "beguiling characters" and describing it as "a fine first novel."

Rusch collaborated with Kevin J. Anderson on Afterimage. The plot of this tale hinges on the existence of shape shifters who can help people jump from one body to another. One such being is able to save the life of Rebecca, left for dead after being assaulted and raped by the Joan of Arc killer. Unfortunately, she is spirited into the body of the last image left upon her mind—that of her attacker. She must conceal her temporary form from the police while she seeks a way to return to her old body. Jody Hanson in Kliatt thought Afterimage was "an excellent, thoroughly enjoyable book," though she did caution readers about the graphic rape scenes. Hanson felt, however, that these were not gratuitous depictions, but rather that they helped readers understand "the horror of these crimes."

The protagonist of Traitors, Rusch's next novel, is Diate, who reluctantly gives up his talent for dance, a compromise he makes in order to live in safety among the island people of Golga. On Golga he waits for the right time to seek revenge upon the rulers of his native land, whom he believes slaughtered all his family members. A Science Fiction Chronicle reviewer described Traitors as "entertaining" and "a well concocted mix."

With Edward L. Ferman, the previous editor of the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Rusch edited Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction. Gary K. Wolfe recalled in Locus that the magazine from which the anthology sprang "was bending traditional genre boundaries decades before … others broadened the scope of the competition," cited many stories as worthy of attention, and concluded: "In all, this latest addition to a distinguished series honors both the magazine's rich tradition and its interesting new directions." Deborah A. Feulner, writing in Voice of Youth Advocates, wrote that "readers … will be pleased with the variety of stories presented."

Rusch tried her hand at vampire fiction in the 1994 novel Sins of the Blood. This book proposes that in the United States everyone acknowledges the existence of vampires. In some states, they are treated as victims of disease; in others, they are legally hunted down and killed, primarily through the efforts of bounty hunters. One such killer is the protagonist in Sins of the Blood, a woman whose own father is a vampire. During the course of the novel, she seeks to find her long-estranged brother, and protect him from joining the vampiric world. A Science Fiction Chronicle contributor noted "the well delineated central character" of Sins of the Blood, and described Rusch's vampire world as "tantalizing."

In 1996, Rusch began an epic work about an evil people known as "the Fey" with The Sacrifice. In this novel, the target of the Fey is the magical Blue Isle, and Prince Rugar, the son of the Black King of the Fey, leads the attack. Because of the Blue Isle's magic, the attackers are repulsed by its denizens, but the Fey are unlikely to give up their quest for world domination. Though she warned readers about what she saw as "gruesome" warfare descriptions, Kliatt critic Karen Ellis recommended The Sacrifice, saying that "the diversity of characterization, as shaped by contrasting cultures, is fascinating."

As for the origins of the Fey, Rusch told SF Site interviewer Jayme Lynn Blaschke: "I just tend to accumulate weird facts…. I got the idea for The Fey somewhere in 1981 or '82, but it wasn't anything really developed." When she began work in earnest, Rusch described the work to her editor as "a Hundred Years' War. Now, if you've read [the series] you realize I haven't gotten anywhere close to a hundred years." As she began volume one of the series, Rusch said she realized "I'd started in the wrong place. Essentially, I'd started in year fifty of my hundred years' war, and to explain what was going to happen, I had to go back. So really, we're talking 150 years, but I don't want to scare people."

In the same year The Sacrifice hit bookstands, Rusch also published a novel in the popular "Star Wars" series created by filmmaker George Lucas. Titled The New Rebellion, the story takes familiar characters such as Princess Leia Organa Solo into the first year that former leaders of the evil empire are allowed to hold seats in the Senate. Booklist contributor Roland Green assured readers that "everybody snatches triumph from the jaws of disaster in the nick of time and in the approved fashion." Rusch described her "Star Wars" and "Star Trek" series tie-in books to Blaschke as "the ultimate fan fic[tion]." Such sagas, she added, "have taken over our love of space opera in many, many areas. Kids will come in and they'll start reading those books first."

Rusch has also written historical fiction, most notably Hitler's Angel, which began, the author told Blaschke, as "a historical, alternate history novella. Hitler's niece was murdered, in his apartment, under suspicious circumstances in 1931. If that case had been solved and Hitler had been found guilty—I have no doubt he was guilty of that murder—the entire history of the Western world would've been changed, and millions of lives would've been saved."

Writing under the pseudonym Kris Nelscott, Rusch began a new series featuring black American private investigator Smokey Dalton. The series is set in the 1960s, and in the first book, A Dangerous Road, Smokey is living in Memphis, Tennessee, during a period of racial tension when he is notified that he has been named as a beneficiary in the will of a white person in Chicago. As the story unfolds, Smokey's close relationship with Martin Luther King, Jr., is revealed. The series continues with Smoke-Filled Rooms, in which Smokey is in Chicago during the Democratic Convention in the company of a boy who knows the real killer of King. "Nelscott does a superb job of using a familiar historical moment to dramatize an intimate human drama," wrote Bill Ott in Booklist.

Thin Walls finds Smokey still in Chicago and investigating the deaths of a number of black victims. Abortion is the focus of the next addition to the series, Stone Cribs, wherein Smokey, a.k.a. Bill Grimshaw, investigates the underground abortion market to get to the bottom of a revenge homicide. A critic for Kirkus Reviews thought that the various elements of this historical mystery "take this crackerjack series to new heights." More praise came from a Publishers Weekly reviewer, who called the novel "remarkable," and in Booklist, Ott dubbed this fourth installment "another winner in a high-class crime series."

Rusch entered the fantasy romance field with the novels Utterly Charming, Thoroughly Kissed, and Completely Smitten, written under the pseudonym of Kristine Grayson. In Simply Irresistible, Vivian Kineally is a psychic unaware of her powers and also a comics superheros fan. Three women who call themselves the Fates look to Vivian for protection, claiming they are being threatened. The Fates tell Vivian to get help from pet store owner and mage Dexter Grant, a hundred-year-old man whose appearance and physique belie his age and who falls in love with Vivian, thinking her to be the woman he has been waiting for all of his long life. A Publishers Weekly contributor wrote: "Zany and over-the-top, this playful novel is a delight." Booklist contributor John Charles described the story as being "an enchanting blend of sweet romance, mythology, and magic." In Absolutely Captivated, Vivian convinces her brother, Travers, to drive the Fates cross country to look for Zoe Sinclair. When they find her, Travers, who also discovers that he has powers, falls for the beautiful woman they had supposed to be dead.

The Retrieval Artist and Other Stories is a collection that inspired a series. The first volume in the series is The Disappeared, which finds detective Miles Flint involved in intergalactic crime. Flint serves with his partner, Noelle Ricci, in a colony on the moon called the Armstrong Dome. The people of Earth interact with other civilizations in an atmosphere of tolerance, even though other alien cultures have very different ideas about crime and punishment. Donna Scanlon reviewed the book for Rambles, commenting: "I could imagine the story told in a fantasy setting, with the circumstances adapted to that genre and indeed, there are some fairy tale elements in the book, whether by accident or design."

In Extremes, Flint the retrieval artist is tracking down the Disappeared, outlaws who have committed crimes against aliens. In this outing, he has two cases on his hands, a death that occurs during the Moon Marathon and a death caused by a virus with no known cure. Consequences, the next entry in the series, finds Flint searching for a woman who is now Disappeared because she was involved in a civil war. "Rusch mounts hard-boiled noir on an expansive sf background with great panache," wrote Regina Schroeder in Booklist.

The skeletal remains of a human found on Mars are the focus of Buried Deep. The Disty, who manage most of the planet and who play a major role in this story, insist that the murder victim's surviving relations be located so that the area may be purified according to Disty custom. When another hundred bodies are found, the Disty's horror nearly destroys diplomatic relations. Schroeder commented that the series "continues to blend mystery and space opera satisfyingly in another stylish entertainment."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

BOOKS

St. James Guide to Fantasy Writers, St. James Press (Detroit, MI), 1996.

St. James Guide to Science Fiction Writers, 4th edition, St. James Press (Detroit, MI), 1996.

PERIODICALS

Analog Science Fiction & Fact, September, 1991, review of Science Fiction Writers of America Handbook: The Professional Writer's Guide to Writing Professionally, p. 161; May, 1992, Tom Easton, review of The Gallery of His Dreams, p. 161.

Bloomsbury Review, December, 1991, Edward Bryant, review of The Best of Pulphouse: The Hardback Magazine, p. 27.

Booklist, October 1, 1996, Roland Green, review of Star Wars: The New Rebellion, p. 292; July, 2000, Bill Ott, review of A Dangerous Road, p. 2014; April 15, 2001, Roland Green, review of Stories for an Enchanted Afternoon, p. 1543; July, 2001, Bill Ott, review of Smoke-Filled Rooms, p. 1989; June 1, 2002, Terrence Miltner, review of The Disappeared, p. 1698; August, 2002, Bill Ott, review of Thin Walls, p. 1932; September 1, 2002, Terrence Miltner, review of The Retrieval Artist, and Other Stories, p. 71; December 15, 2002, John Charles, review of Simply Irresistible, p. 738; June 1, 2003, Roland Green, review of Extremes, p. 1755; January 1, 2004, Nina C. Davis, review of Absolutely Captivated, p. 836; February 15, 2004, Bill Ott, review of Stone Cribs, p. 1033; April 15, 2004, Regina Schroeder, review of Consequences, p. 1434; March 15, 2005, Regina Schroeder, review of Buried Deep, p. 1276.

Bookwatch, May, 1991, review of Science Fiction Writers of America Handbook, p. 6; April, 1992, review of The White Mists of Power, p. 6.

Kirkus Reviews, July 15, 1991, review of The Best of Pulphouse, p. 896; August 1, 2002, review of Thin Walls, p. 108; November 15, 2003, review of Stone Cribs, p. 1343.

Kliatt, November, 1992, Jody Hanson, review of Afterimage, pp. 18-19; March, 1996, Karen Ellis, review of The Sacrifice, p. 20; January, 2004, Ginger Armstrong, review of Extremes, p. 24.

Library Journal, November 15, 1991, review of The White Mists of Power, p. 111; July, 1999, Jackie Cassada, review of The Black Queen, p. 143.

Locus, February, 1991, review of Science Fiction Writers of America Handbook, pp. 38, 58; March, 1991, review of Science Fiction Writers of America Handbook, p. 25; May, 1991, review of Science Fiction Writers of America Handbook, p. 29; June, 1991, review of The Best of Pulphouse, p. 29; July, 1991, review of The Gallery of His Dreams, pp. 23, 27, 48; September, 1991, review of The White Mists of Power, p. 25; October, 1991, reviews of The White Mists of Power, p. 15, and The Best of Pulphouse, p. 52; December, 1991, review of The White Mists of Power, p. 55; January, 1992, review of The White Mists of Power, p. 59; September, 1992, review of Afterimage, p. 62; October, 1992, reviews of Afterimage, p. 23, and The Best of Pulphouse, p. 54; October, 1994, Gary K. Wolfe, review of Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction, p. 58.

Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, October, 1992, review of The White Mists of Power, p. 23; May, 1998, Charles de Lint, review of Alien Influences, p. 21.

MBR Bookwatch, April, 2005, review of Buried Deep.

Publishers Weekly, August 16, 1991, review of The Best of Pulphouse, p. 51; October 4, 1991, review of The White Mists of Power, p. 84; September 29, 1997, review of Alien Influences, p. 86; September 24, 2001, review of Little Miracles and Other Tales of Murder, p. 73; August 12, 2002, review of Thin Walls, p. 281; November 25, 2002, review of Simply Irresistible, p. 49; December 15, 2003, review of Stone Cribs, p. 56.

Science Fiction Chronicle, April, 1991, review of Science Fiction Writers of America Handbook, p. 30; August, 1991, review of The Gallery of His Dreams, p. 24; November, 1991, review of The Best of Pulphouse, p. 33; March, 1992, review of The White Mists of Power, pp. 20, 30; August, 1992, review of Afterimage, p. 49; October, 1993, review of Traitors, p. 36; February, 1995, review of Sins of the Blood, p. 38.

Voice of Youth Advocates, April, 1992, Denice Thornhill, review of The White Mists of Power, pp. 46-47; December, 1994, Deborah Feulner, review of Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction, pp. 282-283.

ONLINE

Kristine Kathryn Rusch Home Page,http://www.kristinekathrynrusch.com (March 5, 2007).

Rambles,http://www.rambles.net/ (September 7, 2002), Donna Scanlon, review of The Disappeared.

SF Reviews.net,http://www.sfreviews.net/ (March 6, 2007), T.M. Wagner, review of The Disappeared.

SF Site,http://www.sfsite.com/ (March 5, 2007), Jayme Lynn Blaschke, "A Conversation with Kristine Kathryn Rusch."

About this article

Rusch, Kristine Kathryn 1960- (Kristine Grayson, Kris Nelscott, Kris Rusch, Sandy Schofield, Kathryn Wesley)

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