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MacMillan, Malcolm (Bruce) 1929-

MACMILLAN, Malcolm (Bruce) 1929-

PERSONAL:

Born January 1, 1929, in Perth, Western Australia; son of Ian Stewart and Mabel Evelyn (Sinclair) Macmillan; children: Luisa Ann Macmillan Tanter, Ian Scott, Gregor James. Ethnicity: "Australian." Education: University of Western Australia, B.Sc., 1950; University of Melbourne, M.Sc., 1964; Monash University, D.Sc., 1992. Politics: "Communist in search of a party." Hobbies and other interests: Traditional jazz, chamber music, wine.

ADDRESSES:

Office—School of Psychology, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia. E-mail—[email protected].

CAREER:

Australian Council for Educational Research, research assistant, 1955; Department of Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, began as psychologist at Mental Hygiene Branch, became senior psychologist, 1955-64; Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, senior lecturer in psychology, 1965-94; Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia, adjunct professor of psychology, 1994—. University of Wisconsin—Madison, visiting professor, 1972-73; Cambridge University, visiting scholar, 1979; Stanford University, visiting professor, 1979; University of Arizona, visiting professor, 1989; University of Pittsburgh, visiting fellow at Center for Philosophy of Science, 1993; Northern Michigan University, visiting professor, 1999; Oxford University, visiting fellow at McDonnell Centre for Cognitive Neurosciences, 2002; guest lecturer at other institutions, including New York University, New School for Social Research, and University of Beijing; public speaker in Australia and abroad.

MEMBER:

International Society for the History of the Neurosciences (founding member), Cheiron: International Society for the History of the Behavioral Sciences, Australian Psychological Society (founding member; fellow; president, 1984-85), American Psychological Society (fellow), History of Science Society (United States).

AWARDS, HONORS:

Association of American Publishers Award, professional and scholarly publishing division, 2001, for An Odd Kind of Fame: Stories of Phineas Gage; inaugural prize for "book making the most outstanding and original contribution to the history of the neurosciences in the period between 1999 and 2001," 2002.

WRITINGS:

The Historical and Scientific Evaluation of Psychoanalytic Personality Theory, Department of Psychology, Monash University (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia), 1974.

Freud Evaluated: The Completed Arc, North-Holland (Amsterdam, Netherlands), 1991.

Evaluating Freud: The Poor Students' Guide, Department of Psychology, Monash University (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia), 1992.

Critical Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis, Monash University (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia), 1993.

An Odd Kind of Fame: Stories of Phineas Gage, MIT Press (Cambridge, MA), 2000.

Contributor to books, including Sigmund Freud: Critical Assessments, Volume 1, edited by L. Spurling, Routledge (London, England), 1989; Freud and the History of Psychoanalysis, edited by T. Gelfand and J. Kerr, Analytic Press (Hillsdale, NJ), 1992; Classic Cases in Neuropsychology, edited by C. Code and others, Erlbaum (East Sussex, England), 1996; and Psychoanalytic Knowledge and the Nature of Mind, edited by M. C. Chung and C. Feltham, Palgrave (London, England), 2003. Contributor of articles and reviews to academic journals, including Psychological Inquiry, Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, British Journal of Medical Psychology, Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Journal of Autism and Childhood Schizophrenia, Brain and Cognition, Australian Psychologist, and American Imago. Book review editor, Australian Journal of Psychology, 1966-72; member of editorial board, Journal of the History of the Neurosciences, 1996—, and History of Psychology, 1997—.

WORK IN PROGRESS:

A study of pioneer brain surgeon William Macewen.

SIDELIGHTS:

Malcolm Macmillan told CA: "My primary motivation for writing is to report scientific research and to evaluate scientific theories, especially by considering their historical development. My work is particularly influenced by Marx and Engels. My inspiration is curiosity. I get an idea; I think and read about it; I get confused and swamped; a framework develops (by itself); and I set about writing."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Isis, March, 2002, Kieran O'Driscoll, review of An Odd Kind of Fame: Stories of Phineas Gage, p. 138.

Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, July, 2001, John Hodges, review of An Odd Kind of Fame, p. 136.

Journal of the American Medical Association, January 10, 2001, Randolph W. Evans, review of An Odd Kind of Fame, p. 215.

Lancet, February 17, 2001, Paul Crichton, review of An Odd Kind of Fame, p. 566.

Quarterly Review of Biology, December, 2001, Jonathon Erlen, review of An Odd Kind of Fame, p. 521.

Science, October 27, 2000, John C. Marshall, review of An Odd Kind of Fame, p. 718.

Student BMJ, June, 2001, Sally-Ann S. Price, review of An Odd Kind of Fame, p. 213.

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