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Frankel, Felice 1945-

FRANKEL, Felice 1945-

PERSONAL:

Born 1945, in Brooklyn, NY.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 13-2050, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139. E-mail—[email protected].

CAREER:

Research scientist and photographer. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, researcher.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Science Foundation, the Graham Foundation for the Advanced Study of the Arts, and the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation.

WRITINGS:

(With Jory Johnson) Modern Landscape Architecture: Redefining the Garden, Abbeville Press, 1991.

On the Surface of Things: Images of the Extraordinary in Science, Chronicle Books (New York, NY), 1997.

(And photographer) Envisioning Science: The Design and Craft of the Science Image, MIT Press (Cambridge, MA), 2002.

WORK IN PROGRESS:

No Small Matter, a book on nanoscience, with George M. Whitesides.

SIDELIGHTS:

Award-winning photographer Felice Frankel has a natural ability to "balance aesthetic appeal with scientific integrity," according to Elizabeth Armstrong in the Christian Science Monitor. Frankel showcases her work in the 2002 book Envisioning Science: The Design and Craft of the Science Image.

In Envisioning Science Frankel describes in depth her techniques for capturing some of her most compelling scientific images. With this book she hopes to inspire others with her own original perspective on science-related endeavors; as she stated to Armstrong in the Christian Science Monitor: "I'd love this book to turn enough scientists or people who love science on to the possibility that they can contribute." A reviewer for the Scientific American raved, "Open the book at random, and your eye will be dazzled," while Ivars Peterson stated in Science News: "The exquisite details, shadowed nuances, and vivid hues of Frankel's portraits of materials offer a stark contrast to the often murky, monochromatic images squeezed into the drab, text-laden pages of scientific journals. Her photographs portray science through an artist's lens. They unveil a rich store of information valuable to both researcher and casual viewer."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Christian Science Monitor, June 20, 2002, Elizabeth Armstrong, review of Envisioning Science: The Design and Craft of the Science Image, p. 16.

Discover, November, 1997, Polly Shulman, review of On the Surface of Things: Images of the Extraordinary in Science, p. 125.

Library Journal, September 15, 1997, Robert C. Ballou, review of On the Surface of Things, p. 98.

Newsweek, November 3, 1997, Malcolm Jones, Jr., review of On the Surface of Things, p. 84.

New York Times, August 6, 2002, review of Envisioning Science, p. F3.

Odyssey, November, 1999, Kathiann M. Kowaldki, review of Envisioning Science, p. 22.

Science News, December 20, 1997, Ivars Peterson, review of Envisioning Science, p. 394; November 9, 2002, review of Envisioning Science, p. 303.

Scientific American, September, 2002, review of Envisioning Science, p. 98.

ONLINE

Felice Frankel Home Page, http://web.mit.edu/felicef/ (April 28, 2004).

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