Fagan, Brian M. 1936–

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Fagan, Brian M. 1936–

(Brian Murray Fagan)

PERSONAL: Born August 1, 1936, in Birmingham, England; naturalized U.S. citizen; son of Brian Walter and Margaret (Moir) Fagan; married Lesley Ann Newhart, March 16, 1985; children: Lindsay, Anastasia. Education: Pembroke College, Cambridge, B.A. (with honors), 1959, M.A., 1962, Ph.D., 1964. Hobbies and other interests: Sailing (since the age of eight), kayaking, bicycling, cooking, cats.

ADDRESSES: Home—Santa Barbara, CA. Office—Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106. E-mail[email protected]

CAREER: Livingstone Museum, Livingstone, Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), keeper of prehistory, 1959–65; British Institute of History and Archaeology in East Africa, Nairobi, Kenya, director of Bantu studies project, 1965–66; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, visiting associate professor of anthropology, 1966–67; University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, associate professor, 1967–68, professor of anthropology, 1968–2003, director of Center for the Study of Developing Nations, 1969–70, associate dean of research and graduate affairs, 1970–72, associate dean of College of Letters and Science, 1972–73, dean of instructional development, 1973–76, professor emeritus of anthropology, 2003–. University of Capetown, Capetown, South Africa, lecturer, 1960, visiting professor, 1982; Munro Lecturer, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, 1967; Richard M. Nixon Visiting Scholar and Lecturer, Whittier College, 1976.

Zambia Monuments Commission, member, 1960–65, secretary, 1960–62; director of Kalomo/Choma Iron Age project, 1960–63, of Lochinvar research project, 1963–64, and of Bantu studies project in Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania; conducted archaeological research in Zambia and Northern Nigeria, 1969–70. Evaluation of International Audio-Visual Resource Service, United Nations Fund for Population Activities, consultant to administrator and head of mission, 1976; Center for Democratic Institutions, director, 1979–80. Columnist for Archaeology (magazine), 1989–94; member of editorial board of the Cambridge Archaeological Journal; senior consultant for Time/Life Television's Emmy Award-winning series Lost Civilizations, 1996; lecturer on African history and archeological topics in the United States and abroad. Military service: Royal Navy, 1954–56.

MEMBER: Royal Geographical Society (fellow), Royal Anthropological Institute (fellow), Society for American Archaeology (board member, 1991–93), South African Archaeological Society, Santa Barbara Yacht Club.

AWARDS, HONORS: Grants from Wenner-Gren Foundation, 1967 and 1968, and National Science Foundation, 1968–70, 1970–71, and 1990; Guggenheim fellow, 1972–73; Gold Medal for nonfiction, Commonwealth Club, 1975, for The Rape of the Nile: Tomb Robbers, Tourists, and Archaeologists in Egypt; Hanson Cup, Cruising Association, 1975, for a cruise to Scandinavia; EDUCOM Award, 1990, for curriculum innovation in large undergraduate courses; Distinguished Service Award, Society of Professional Archaeologists, 1996; Presidential Recognition Award, 1996, and Public Education Award, 1997, both from Society for American Archaeology; Distinguished Teaching Award, University of California, Santa Barbara.

WRITINGS:

(Editor) Victoria Falls: A Handbook to the Victoria Falls, the Batoka Gorge, and Part of the Upper Zambesi River, 2nd edition, Commission for the Preservation of Natural and Historic Monuments and Relics (Lusaka, Northern Rhodesia), 1964.

(With G.C.R. Clay) The Life and Work of David Livingstone: A Brief Guide to the Livingstone Collections in the Livingstone Museum (revision of Guide to the David Livingstone Centenary Exhibition), National Museums of Zambia (Livingstone, Zambia), 1965.

Southern Africa during the Iron Age, F.A. Praeger (New York, NY), 1965.

(Editor) A Short History of Zambia: From the Earliest Times until A.D. 1900, Oxford University Press (Lusaka, Zambia), 1966.

Iron Age Cultures in Zambia, Humanities (Atlantic Highlands, NJ), Volume 1: Kalomo and Kangila, 1967, Volume 2 (with S.G.H. Daniels and D.W. Phillipson): Dambwa, Ingombe Ilede, and the Tonga, 1969.

(Editor) Introductory Readings in Archaeology, Little, Brown (Boston, MA), 1970.

(Author of introduction and editorial note) Randall MacIver, Medieval Rhodesia, Cass & Co. (London, England), 1971.

(With Francis L. van Noten) The Hunter-Gatherers of Gwisho, Musée Royal de l'Afrique Centralo (Tervuren, Belgium), 1971.

(Editor) Louis S.B. Leakey, The Stone Age Cultures of Kenya Colony, Cass & Co. (London, England), 1971.

In the Beginning: An Introduction to Archaeology, Little, Brown (Boston, MA), 1972, 11th edition, Prentice Hall (Upper Saddle River, NJ), 2005.

Ingombe Ilede: Early Trade in South Central Africa, Addison Wesley (Reading, MA), 1972.

A Cruising Guide to California Channel Islands, Capra (Santa Barbara, CA), 1972, 4th edition, Caractacus Corp. (Santa Barbara, CA), 1992.

(With J.T. Robinson and Melvin L. Fowler) Human and Cultural Development, Indiana Historical Society (Indianapolis, IN), 1974.

Men of the Earth: An Introduction to World Prehistory, Little, Brown (Boston, MA), 1974, 2nd edition published as People of the Earth: An Introduction to World Prehistory, 1977, 11th edition, Prentice Hall (Upper Saddle River, NJ), 2004.

(Editor) Corridors in Time: A Reader in Introductory Archaeology, Little, Brown (Boston, MA), 1974.

The Rape of the Nile: Tomb Robbers, Tourists, and Archaeologists in Egypt, Scribners (New York, NY), 1975, revised edition, Westview Press (Boulder, CO), 2004.

(With Roland Oliver) Africa in the Iron Age, c. 500 B.C. to A.D. 1400, Cambridge University Press (New York, NY), 1975.

(Author of introductions) Avenues to Antiquity: Readings from Scientific American, W.H. Freeman (San Francisco, CA), 1976.

Elusive Treasure: The Story of Early Archaeologists in the Americas, Scribners (New York, NY), 1977.

Quest for the Past: Great Discoveries in Archaeology, Addison Wesley (Reading, MA), 1977.

(Author of introductions) Civilization: Readings from Scientific American, W.H. Freeman (San Francisco, CA), 1978.

Archaeology: A Brief Introduction, Little, Brown (Boston, MA), 1978, 9th edition, Prentice Hall (Upper Saddle River, NJ), 2006.

World Prehistory: A Brief Introduction, Little, Brown (Boston, MA), 1979, 6th edition, Prentice Hall (Upper Saddle River, NJ), 2005.

Return to Babylon: Travelers, Archaeologists, and Monuments in Mesopotamia, Little, Brown (Boston, MA), 1979.

Cruising Guide to the Channel Islands, photographs by Graham Pomeroy, Capra Press (Santa Barbara, CA), 1979, revised edition, Western Marine Enterprises (Ventura, CA), 1983, revised edition published as Cruising Guide to Southern California's Offshore Islands: With Sailing Directions for the Santa Barbara Channel's Mainland Coast, Caractacus Corp. (Santa Barbara, CA), 1993.

California Coastal Passages: From San Francisco to Ensenada, Mexico, Capra Press (Santa Barbara, CA), 1981.

(Author of introductions) Prehistoric Times: Readings from Scientific American, W.H. Freeman (San Francisco, CA), 1983.

The Aztecs, W.H. Freeman (New York, NY), 1984.

Clash of Cultures, W.H. Freeman (New York, NY), 1984.

Bareboating, International Marine Publishing (Camden, ME), 1985.

The Adventure of Archaeology, National Geographic Society (Washington, DC), 1985, revised edition, 1989.

Anchoring, International Marine Publishing (Camden, ME), 1986, expanded edition published as Staying Put!: The Art of Anchoring, Caractacus Corp. (Santa Barbara, CA), 1993.

The Great Journey: The Peopling of Ancient America, Thames and Hudson (New York, NY), 1987, updated edition, University Press of Florida (Gainesville, FL), 2004.

New Treasures of the Past: Fresh Finds that Deepen Our Understanding of the Archaeology of Man, Barron's (New York, NY), 1987.

The Journey from Eden: The Peopling of Our World, Thames and Hudson (New York, NY), 1990.

Ancient North America: The Archaeology of a Continent, Thames and Hudson (New York, NY), 1991, 4th edition, 2005.

Kingdoms of Gold and Jade: The Americas before Columbus, Thames and Hudson (New York, NY), 1991.

Cruising Guide: San Francisco to Ensenada, Mexico, Caractacus Corp. (Santa Barbara, CA), 1994.

Time Detectives: How Archaeologists Use Technology to Recapture the Past, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1995.

(With others) Ancient America, introduction by Karen Sinsheimer, edited by Patrick O'Dowd, R. Rinehart Publishers (Boulder, CO), 1995.

Snapshots of the Past, AltaMira Press (Walnut Creek, CA), 1995.

(With Charles E. Orser, Jr.) Historical Archaeology, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1995.

(Editor) The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 1996.

(Editor) Eyewitness to Discovery: First-Person Accounts of More than Fifty of the World's Greatest Archaeological Discoveries, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 1996.

Catalina Cruising Guide, Caractacus Corp. (Santa Barbara, CA), 1997.

Into the Unknown: Solving Ancient Mysteries, National Geographic Society (Washington, DC), 1997.

(With Christopher Scarre) Ancient Civilizations, Longman (New York, NY), 1997.

Boating Guide, San Francisco Bay, photographs by Patrick Short, Caractacus Corp. (Santa Barbara, CA), 1998.

From Black Land to Fifth Sun: The Science of Sacred Sites, Addison Wesley (Reading, MA), 1998.

Floods, Famines, and Emperors: El Niño and the Fate of Civilizations, Basic Books (New York, NY), 1999.

Ancient Lives: An Introduction to Method and Theory in Archaeology, Prentice Hall (Upper Saddle River, NJ), 2000.

The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History, 1300–1850, Basic Books (New York, NY), 2000.

Egypt of the Pharaohs, photographs by Kenneth Garrett, National Geographic Society (Washington, DC), 2001.

Grahame Clark: An Intellectual Life of an Archeologist, Westview Press (Boulder, CO), 2001.

The Cruising Guide to Central and Southern California: Golden Gate to Ensenada, Mexico, including the Offshore Islands, International Marine/McGraw Hill (Camden, ME), 2002.

(Editor) The Seventy Great Mysteries of the Ancient World: Unlocking the Secrets of Past Civilizations, Thames and Hudson (New York, NY), 2001.

The Discovery of Ancient Civilizations (sound recording), Teaching Co. (Chantilly, VA), 2002.

Archaeologists: Explorers of the Human Past, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 2003.

Before California: An Archaeologist Looks at Our Earliest Inhabitants, Rowman & Littlefield (Lanham, MD), 2003.

(Editor) The Seventy Great Inventions of the Ancient World, Basic Books (New York, NY), 2004.

The Long Summer: How Climate Changed Civilization, Granta Books (London, England), 2004.

A Brief History of Archaeology: Classical Times to the Twenty-first Century, Pearson/Prentice Hall (Upper Saddle River, NJ), 2005.

Chaco Canyon: Archeologists Explore the Lives of an Ancient Society, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 2005.

Fish on Friday: Feasting, Fasting, and the Discovery of the New World, Basic Books (New York, NY), 2005.

Also writer for Patterns of the Past, a National Public Radio (NPR) series on archaeology funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Contributor to UNESCO History of Africa, Volume 2, 1984. Contributor of numerous chapters to books and hundreds of articles and reviews to professional journals, popular magazines, and newspapers.

SIDELIGHTS: Anthropologist and archaeologist Brian M. Fagan's writings include many that are geared towards broad audiences and that are understandable to nonspecialists. One such book is the 1996 publication The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, a collection of 700 articles by 350 scholars that covers a wide range of topics. A Booklist reviewer referred to the volume as "the only recent work of its kind."

Eyewitness to Discovery: First-Person Accounts of More than Fifty of the World's Greatest Archaeological Discoveries spans 200 years of findings on all the continents, dating from 5,000 years ago to the more recent excavations of a Virginia colony and a Manhattan graveyard. An Economist reviewer wrote that "some of these accounts are as thrilling as a detective story (the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls); one or two are full of a strange, astonished poetry (John Lloyd Stephens's account of the jungle ruins of Copan in Honduras); others are full of gold." "Though many of these accounts come from the time of science," wrote Anthony Sinclair in Antiquity, "it is still the incidental and personal side that remains most revealing."

From Black Land to Fifth Sun: The Science of Sacred Sites is a study of cave paintings, burial mounds, pyramids, stone circles, and other sites Fagan has examined using modern technological methods in an attempt to understand the cultures with which they are associated. A Publishers Weekly reviewer commented that Fagan "takes us on an often gripping first-person tour of the world's past, and his excitement in surveying these areas for himself is almost palpable."

Fagan's Floods, Famines, and Emperors: El Niño and the Fate of Civilizations combines climatology with archaeology in examining the impact of ancient El Niños and other weather phenomena that have influenced weather over the Indian and South Pacific Oceans. Evidence of such activity has been detected in ice cores and lake sediments, indicating a contribution to the decline of pre-Columbian civilizations. "Fagan exhibits a conversant command of El Niño's history and its possible indications of global warming," wrote Gilbert Taylor in Booklist. In a National Forum review, James P. Kaetz noted that Fagan "beats the environmental drum, but not too heavily, and (at least from my lay perspective) his scientific information and historical detail are thorough and understandable."

In The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History, 1300–1850, Fagan provides a history of the hard times that hit Europe beginning in 1315, when heavy rains prevented a spring planting. Centuries of cooling weather followed, with the Thames freezing regularly from 1650 through 1715. Fagan feels that these weather patterns contributed to food shortages, the breakup of Norse settlements in Greenland, the French Revolution, and the Irish famine. Climatologists believe the 500-year event was triggered by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and that its effect on history was undeniable. "This book is noteworthy for its chronological and geographical scope," wrote Nancy R. Curtis in the Library Journal.

Fagan has also published Before California: An Archaeologist Looks at Our Earliest Inhabitants. This time the author provides a history of the land of California from approximately 11,000 B.C. up to the arrival of the Spaniards in the sixteenth century. Fagan has also produced a revised edition of The Rape of the Nile, which Taylor, writing in Booklist, recommended as containing "exciting, colorful adventures for Indiana Jones admirers." Inspired and intrigued by the debates surrounding global warming, Fagan turns his attention to how climate has affected the earth's past in his book The Long Summer: How Climate Changed Civilization. The author focuses primarily on the periods between 18,000 B.C. to 1200 A.D. A Contemporary Review contributor noted that Fagan discusses how human beings' "relationship with … climate has always been 'in flux,'" adding "how man adapted to change is the theme" of the book.

Focusing on the world prior to 500 B.C., Fagan served as the editor of a book about early human innovations that changed the world. Titled The Seventy Great Inventions of the Ancient World, the volume includes various essays discussing such early technologies as ploughs and cloth-making tools. The various authors also look at early inventions dealing with transportation, as well as the development of adornments such as tattoos and jewelry. A Contemporary Review contributor noted that Fagan and the authors present "an entrancing story of man's development choc a bloc with bits of information." Writing in MBR Bookwatch, Diane C. Donovan called the effort "engagingly informative."

Fagan once told CA: "I became interested in popular writing about archaeology while working in Zambia during the 1960s. The early 1960s saw tumultuous and lasting political changes which resulted in the complete revamping of school and university history curricula. We had to create national history from excavations rather than written records, compiling A Short History of Zambia: From the Earliest Times until A.D. 1900, from a patchwork of archaeology, oral history, and documents in 1966. The book remained the standard source in Zambian schools and at the University of Zambia for more than twenty years. I also became involved in radio and TV, as well as guidebook and newspaper article writing—a wonderful grounding for a working writer.

"Since coming to the United States in 1966, I have moved away from African archaeology and history and have worked on the complex issue of communicating archaeology to popular audiences. At the same time, I've been deeply involved in developing new approaches to teaching large university courses in archaeology for undergraduate audiences, also in much popular lecturing. Inevitably, these activities led me into textbook writing and eventually into trade books.

"I started textbook writing in 1967, and saw my first method and theory text, In the Beginning: An Introduction to Archaeology, published in 1972. Since then, I have published more than half a dozen college texts, all of which are in multiple editions. Many archaeologists have flattered me by calling them standard works. The experience of these books has given me a uniquely broad grip on world archaeology, a stimulating change in a world of acute specialization and narrowly focused writing and research.

"My trade career began with a chance letter from Scribners about an article I wrote for Archaeology Magazine on Giovanni Belzoni, the Egyptian tomb robber. Their inquiry led to The Rape of the Nile: Tomb Robbers, Tourists, and Archaeologists in Egypt, now in nine languages, and a whole new vista of writing opportunity. I have continued to write about archaeology for the general public ever since. Since the late 1980s, I have developed a special interest in American archaeology, where uncontrolled looting threatens the future both of archaeology and the Native American past. Ancient North America: The Archaeology of a Continent, a general account of North American archaeology, and The Great Journey: The Peopling of Ancient America, a description of the first settlement of the Americas, are the result. The National Geographic Society provided me with two unique opportunities to write books on archaeology for a very wide audience indeed. The Adventure of Archaeology covers the history of archaeological discovery, while Into the Unknown: Solving Ancient Mysteries describes ways in which science is revolutionizing our knowledge of the remote past. I have also completed the mammoth task of editing The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, intended as a definitive statement on archaeology in the 1990s. An accompanying anthology, Eyewitness to Discovery, features firsthand accounts of major archaeological discoveries by those who have made them. I am continuing studies on ways in which archaeologists study ancient religions.

"I would describe myself as a day-to-day working writer, with feet in many camps. At one end of the spectrum lies the world of academic writing; at the other, highly popular works I have written for National Geographic. I've been very lucky, being one of the few professional archaeologists who writes for a general audience, enjoying frequent book club adoptions and foreign sales of most of my books. My ultimate objective in writing about the past is to communicate the enormous importance and fascination of scientific archaeology. I am NOT interested in mythic interpretations of the past, in ancient astronauts, conquering Egyptians crossing the Atlantic, or other forms of pseudo-archaeology. I'm a scientist who just happens to write for the public—and has fun doing it. The sheer diversity of writing opportunities which cross my desk make my life a constant fascination. And every day I sit at my computer, I realize just how much more I have to learn about the craft of writing."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

American Journal of Archaeology, January, 1998, review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, p. 186.

Amicus Journal, summer, 2001, E.G. Vallianatos, review of The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History, 1300–1850, p. 37.

Antiquity, June, 1997, Anthony Sinclair, review of Eyewitness to Discovery: First-Person Accounts of More than Fifty of the World's Greatest Archaeological Discoveries, p. 460, and review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, p. 464.

Atlantic, January, 1980, review of Return to Babylon: Travelers, Archaeologists, and Monuments in Mesopotamia, p. 88.

Booklist, December 1, 1994, Gilbert Taylor, review of Time Detectives: How Archaeologists Use Technology to Recapture the Past,, p. 642; March 15, 1997, review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, p. 1260; May 15, 1998, Donna Seaman, review of From Black Land to Fifth Sun: The Science of Sacred Sites, p. 1568; February 15, 1999, Gilbert Taylor, review of Floods, Famines, and Emperors: El Niño and the Fate of Civilizations, p. 1018; March 1, 2001, Gilbert Taylor, review of The Little Ice Age, p. 1214; September 15, 2001, Philip Herbst, review of Grahame Clark: An Intellectual Life of an Archeologist, p. 192; October 1, 2004, Gilbert Taylor, review of The Rape of the Nile: Tomb Raiders, Tourists, and Archaeologists in Egypt, p. 296.

Bookwatch, April, 1998, review of Cruising Guide: San Francisco to Ensenada, Mexico, p. 7; October, 1998, review of From Black Land to Fifth Sun, p. 3.

Choice, July, 1997, review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, p. 34; January, 1999, review of From Black Land to Fifth Sun, p. 929; July, 1999, review of Floods, Famines, and Emperors, p. 1971; July-August, 2001, H. N. Pollack, review of The Little Ice Age, p. 1994.

Chronicle of Higher Education, March 12, 1999, review of Floods, Famines, and Emperors, p. A19.

Contemporary Review, December, 2004, review of The Long Summer: How Climate Changed Civilization, p. 377; January, 2005, review of The Seventy Great Inventions of the Ancient World, p. 64.

Discover, February, 2001, Eric N. Nash, review of The Little Ice Age, p. 84.

Economist, May 17, 1997, review of Eyewitness to Discovery, p. S5.

History: Review of New Books, summer, 2001, Roger L. Cunniff, review of The Little Ice Age, p. 184.

History Today, April, 1997, review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology and review of Eyewitness to Discovery, p. 56.

Isis, June, 1999, review of From Black Land to Fifth Sun, p. 357.

Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 1999, review of Floods, Famines, and Emperors, p. 118.

Kliatt, March, 1999, review of Eyewitness to Discovery, p. 38; September, 1999, review of Eyewitness to Discovery, p. 39; November, 1999, review of From Black Land to Fifth Sun, p. 39.

Library Journal, February 15, 1997, Joyce L. Ogburn, review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, p. 129; February 15, 2001, Nancy R. Curtis, review of The Little Ice Age, p. 196; September 1, 2004, Michael Rogers, review of The Rape of the Nile, p. 204.

MBR Bookwatch, March, 2005, Diane C. Donovan, review of The Seventy Great Inventions of the Ancient World.

National Forum, summer, 1999, James P. Kaetz, review of Floods, Famines, and Emperors, p. 38.

Natural History, May, 1997, review of Eyewitness to Discovery, p. 13; April, 1999, review of Floods, Famines, and Emperors, p. 23.

Nature, April 20, 1995, Paul G. Bahn, review of Time Detectives, p. 686; April 17, 1997, review of Eyewitness to Discovery and review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, p. 669; July 23, 1998, review of From Black Land to Fifth Sun, p. 335.

New Scientist, April 26, 1997, review of Eyewitness to Discovery, p. 43; June 28, 1997, review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, p. 42; September 5, 1998, Paul Bahn, review of From Black Land to Fifth Sun, p. 50.

Publishers Weekly, May 25, 1998, review of From Black Land to Fifth Sun, p. 72; February 12, 2001, review of The Little Ice Age, p. 196.

Reference & Research Book News, May, 1997, review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology and review of Eyewitness to Discovery, p. 17; May, 1998, review of Into the Unknown: Solving Ancient Mysteries, p. 19.

Religious Studies Review, October, 1997, review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, p. 396.

Science, February 28, 1997, review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, p. 1276.

Science News, June 14, 2003, review of Before California: An Archaeologist Looks at Our Earliest Inhabitants, p. 383; January 15, 2005, review of The Seventy Great Inventions of the Ancient World, p. 47.

Scientific American, May, 2001, Keay Davidson, review of The Little Ice Age, p. 90.

SciTech Book News, June, 1999, review of Floods, Famines, and Emperors, p. 56.

Virginia Quarterly Review, spring, 1988, review of The Great Journey: The Peopling of Ancient America, p. 68; autumn, 1997, review of The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, p. 139.

Washington Post, May 20, 1999, David Laskin, "Extreme Weather and Human Catastrophes," p. C02.

Washington Post Book World, February 23, 1997, review of Eyewitness to Discovery, p. 13.

ONLINE

Brian Fagan Books Online Web site, http://www.brianfagan.com (November 11, 2005).

Globalist Web site, http://www.theglobalist.com/ (November 11, 2005), biography of Brian Fagan.

Society for California Archaeology Web site, http://www.scahome.org/ (November 11, 2005), Breck Parkman and C. Kristina Roper, 2002 interview with Brian Fagan.