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Golden Gate

Golden Gate, strait, 4 mi (6.4 km) long and 1 to 2 mi (1.6–3.2 km) wide, linking San Francisco Bay with the Pacific Ocean. It was discovered in 1579 by the English explorer Sir Francis Drake. Known as the Golden Gate before the California gold rush, its name became popular during this period because of its mineral connotation. The strait is the drowned mouth of the united Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers and forms an excellent channel, c.400 ft (120 m) deep, into San Francisco Bay. Adorning the strait is the famous Golden Gate Bridge.

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Golden Gate

Golden Gate Strait on the coast of California, USA, linking the Pacific Ocean with San Francisco Bay. Spanish-Mexican explorer Francisco de Ortega landed here in 1769. The Golden Gate Bridge, completed in 1937, spans the strait.

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Golden Gate

Golden Gate ★★ 1993 (R)

Young Fed Dillon is thrown into the hysteria of the communist witch hunt in 1952 San Francisco. He snares Song, a Chinese labor activist, on some very dubious charges. Ten years later he finds himself getting involved with Song's daughter Marilyn (Chen), who knows nothing about her lover's involvement with her family. Then she finds out. Ever-changing moods, sometimes film noir, sometimes a love story, sometimes a nostalgic look back, are confusing. Promising storyline meanders and fades as Director Madden tries to do too much in a short time. Beware of broad stereotypes in every character. 95m/C VHS . Matt Dillon, Joan Chen, Bruno Kirby, Teri Polo, Tzi Ma, Stan(ford) Egi, Peter Murnik, Jack Shearer, George Giudall; D: John Madden; W: David Henry Hwang; C: Bobby Bukowski; M: Elliot Goldenthal.

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