Skip to main content

Black, Jeremy 1955–

Black, Jeremy 1955–

(Jeremy Martin Black)

PERSONAL:

Born October 30, 1955, in London, England; son of Cyril Alfred (an accountant) and Doreen Black; married Elizabeth Sarah Hollis (a doctor), September 7, 1981; children: Timothy James, Philippa Rosemary. Education: Attended Queens College, Cambridge, 1975-78, and St. John's College, Oxford, 1978-79. Hobbies and other interests: Travel, detective fiction, cinema, theater, opera.

ADDRESSES:

Home—Exeter, England. Office—Department of History, University of Exeter, The Queen's Dr., Exeter, Devon EX4 4QJ, England.

CAREER:

Historian, educator, and writer. Oxford University, Oxford, England, senior scholar of Merton College, 1979-80; University of Durham, England, lecturer in history, 1980-90, senior lecturer, 1990-91, became reader, 1991, became director of University Research Foundation and Society of Fellows, 1991, professor, beginning 1994; University of Exeter, England, established chair in history, 1996—. Visiting appointments include West Point Distinguished Visiting Lecturer, 1997.

MEMBER:

British Records Association (member of council, 1990—), Royal Historical Society (member of council, 1991-95, 1996-2000).

AWARDS, HONORS:

Visiting fellow, Merton College, Oxford, 1986, Yale University Center for British Art, 1988, Huntington Library, 1988, Bellagio, Rockefeller Foundation, 1989, and Yale University Beinecke Library, 1991; Member of the British Empire (MBE), 2000.

WRITINGS:

(Editor) Britain in the Age of Walpole, Macmillan (London, England), 1984.

The British and the Grand Tour, Croom Helm (London, England), 1985.

British Foreign Policy in the Age of Walpole, Donald (Edinburgh, Scotland), 1985.

(Editor, with K.W. Schweizer) Essays in European History in Honor of Ragnhild Hatton, Lennoxville, 1985.

The English Press in the Eighteenth Century, Croom Helm (London, England), 1986.

Natural and Necessary Enemies: Anglo-French Relations in the Eighteenth Century, Duckworth (London, England), 1986.

(Editor) The Causes of War in Early Modern Europe, Donald (Edinburgh, Scotland), 1987.

(Editor, with E. Cruickshanks) The Jacobite Challenge, Donald (Edinburgh, Scotland), 1988.

(Editor, with P. Woodfine) The British Navy and the Use of Naval Power in the Eighteenth Century, Leicester University Press (Leicester, England), 1988.

(Editor) Knights Errant and True Englishmen: British Foreign Policy, 1660-1800, Donald (Edinburgh, Scotland), 1989.

(Editor, with K.W. Schweizer) Press and Politics in Hanoverian Britain, Edwin Mellen (Ceredigion, Wales), 1989.

Eighteenth-Century Europe, 1700-1789, Macmillan (London, England), 1990.

Culloden and the '45, Sutton (Gloucestershire, England), 1990.

The Rise of the European Powers, 1679-1793, Arnold (New York, NY), 1990.

Robert Walpole and the Nature of Politics in Early Eighteenth-Century Britain, Macmillan (London, England), 1990.

(Editor) British Politics and Society from Walpole to Pitt, 1742-1789, Macmillan (London, England), 1990.

War for America: The Fight for Independence, 1775-1783, Sutton (Gloucestershire, England), 1991.

A Military Revolution? Military Change and European Society, 1550-1800, Macmillan (London, England), 1991.

(Editor, with Jeremy Gregory) Culture, Politics, and Society in Britain, 1660-1800, Manchester University Press (Manchester, England), 1991.

A System of Ambition? British Foreign Policy, 1660-1793, Longman (New York, NY), 1991.

The Grand Tour, Sutton (Gloucestershire, England), 1992.

Pitt the Elder, Cambridge University Press (New York, NY), 1992.

The British Abroad: The Grand Tour in the Eighteenth Century, St. Martin's (New York, NY), 1992.

Convergence or Divergence? Britain and the Continent, Centre for European Studies, University of Durham (Durham, England), 1992.

The Politics of Britain, 1688-1800, St. Martin's (New York, NY), 1993.

(Editor, with Roy Porter) A Dictionary of Eighteenth-Century World History, Blackwell Reference (Cambridge, MA), 1994.

British Foreign Policy in an Age of Revolutions, 1783-1793, Cambridge University Press (New York, NY), 1994.

European Warfare, 1660-1815, Yale University Press (New Haven, CT), 1994.

Cambridge Illustrated Atlas of Warfare: Renaissance to Revolution, 1492-1792, Cambridge University Press (New York, NY), 1996.

A History of the British Isles, St. Martin's (New York, NY), 1996, 2nd edition, Palgrave Macmillan (New York, NY), 2003.

An Illustrated History of Eighteenth-Century Britain, 1688-1793, St. Martin's (New York, NY), 1996.

Maps and History: Constructing Images of the Past, Yale University Press (New Haven, CT), 1997.

Maps and Politics, University of Chicago Press (Chicago, IL), 1997.

(Editor) Culture and Society in Britain, 1660-1800, Manchester University Press (Manchester, England), 1997.

America or Europe? British Foreign Policy, 1739-1763, UCL Press (Bristol, PA), 1998.

War and the World: Military Power and the Fate of Continents, 1450-2000, Yale University Press (New Haven, CT), 1998.

Why Wars Happen, New York University Press (New York, NY), 1998.

(Editor) European Warfare, 1453-1815, St. Martin's (New York, NY), 1999.

(Editor) War in the Early Modern World, Westview Press (Boulder, CO), 1999.

Britain as a Military Power, 1688-1815, UCL Press (London, England), 1999.

Eighteenth-Century Europe, St. Martin's (New York, NY), 1999.

Warfare in the Eighteenth Century, Cassell (London, England), 1999.

From Louis XIV to Napoleon: The Fate of a Great Power, UCL Press (London, England), 1999.

The Historical Atlas of Britain: The End of the Middle Ages to the Georgian Era, Sutton (Gloucestershire, England), 2000.

(Editor) DK Atlas of World History, DK Publications (New York, NY), 2000.

The Politics of James Bond: From Fleming's Novels to the Big Screen, Praeger (Westport, CT), 2000.

Modern British History since 1900, Macmillan (London, England), 2000.

A New History of Wales, Sutton (Gloucestershire, England), 2000.

A New History of England, Sutton (Gloucestershire, England), 2000.

War: Past, Present, and Future, St. Martin's (New York, NY), 2000.

(Editor) European Warfare, 1815-2000, Palgrave (New York, NY), 2001.

War in the New Century, Continuum Publishing Group, 2001.

Eighteenth-Century Britain, 1688-1783, Palgrave (New York, NY), 2001.

The English Press, 1621-1861, Sutton (Gloucestershire, England), 2001.

The Making of Modern Britain: The Age of Empire to the New Millennium, Sutton (Gloucestershire, England), 2001.

Europe and the World, 1650-1830, Routledge (New York, NY), 2001.

Historical Atlas of Britain: The End of the Middle Ages to the Georgian Era, Sutton (Gloucestershire, England), 2001.

Western Warfare, 1775-1882, Indiana University Press (Bloomington, IN), 2001.

Walpole in Power, Sutton (Gloucestershire, England), 2001.

British Diplomats and Diplomacy, 1688-1800, University of Exeter Press (Exeter, England), 2001.

America as a Military Power, 1775-1865, Praeger (Westport, CT), 2002.

European International Relations, 1648-1815, Palgrave (New York, NY), 2002.

Warfare in the Western World, 1882-1975, Indiana University Press (Bloomington, IN), 2002.

The World in the Twentieth Century, Longman, 2002.

(With Donald M. MacRaild) Nineteenth-Century Britain, Palgrave (New York, NY), 2002.

(Editor) War in the Modern World, 1815-2000, Routledge (New York, NY), 2003.

(Advisory editor) Kristofer Allerfeldt, Race, Radicalism, Religion, and Restriction: Immigration in the Pacific Northwest, 1890-1924, Praeger (Westport, CT), 2003.

France and the Grand Tour, Palgrave Macmillan (New York, NY), 2003.

Italy and the Grand Tour, Yale University Press (New Haven, CT), 2003.

Visions of the World: A History of Maps, Mitchell Beazley (London, England), 2003.

World War Two, Routledge (New York, NY), 2003.

The British Seaborne Empire, Yale University Press (New Haven, CT), 2004.

The Hanoverians: The History of a Dynasty, Hambledon and London (New York, NY), 2004.

Kings, Nobles, and Commoners: States and Societies in Early Modern Europe, a Revisionist History, I.B. Tauris (New York, NY), 2004.

Parliament and Foreign Policy in the Eighteenth Century, Cambridge University Press (New York, NY), 2004.

Rethinking Military History, Routledge (New York, NY), 2004.

War and the New Disorder in the 21st Century, Continuum (New York, NY), 2004.

(Editor) The Seventy Great Battles in History, Thames & Hudson (New York, NY), 2005.

(Editor) Warfare in Europe, 1650-1792, Ashgate (Burlington, VT), 2005.

The Continental Commitment: Britain, Hanover, and Interventionism, 1714-1793, Routledge (New York, NY), 2005.

Introduction to Global Military History: 1775 to the Present Day, Routledge (New York, NY), 2005.

A Subject for Taste: Culture in Eighteenth-Century England, Hambledon and London (New York, NY), 2005.

Using History, Hodder Arnold (London, England), 2005.

War since 1945, Reaktion Books (Chicago, IL), 2005.

(Editor) The Atlantic Slave Trade (four volumes), Ashgate (Burlington, VT), 2006.

(Editor) Revolutions in the Western World, 1775-1825, Ashgate (Burlington, VT), 2006.

The Age of Total War, 1860-1945, Praeger Security International (Westport, CT), 2006.

The European Question and the National Interest, Social Affairs Unit (London, England), 2006.

George III: America's Last King, Yale University Press (New Haven, CT), 2006.

A Military History of Britain: From 1775 to the Present, Praeger Security International (Westport, CT), 2006.

War in European History, 1494-1660: The Essential Bibliography, Potomac Books (Washington, DC), 2006.

Warfare in the Eighteenth Century, Collins/Smithsonian (New York, NY), 2006.

Altered States: America since the Sixties, Reaktion Books (London, England), 2006.

European Warfare in a Global Context, 1660-1815, Routledge (New York, NY), 2007.

Great Powers and the Quest for Hegemony: The World Order since 1500, Routledge (New York, NY), 2007.

(Editor) The Second World War Seven Volume Set, Ashgate (Burlington, VT), 2007.

A Short History of Britain, Social Affairs Unit (London, England), 2007.

Trade, Empire and British Foreign Policy, 1689-1815: Politics of a Commercial State, Routledge (New York, NY), 2007.

The Slave Trade, Social Affairs Unit (London, England), 2007.

Book reviewer. Deputy editor, Journal of Newspaper and Periodical History; editor, Archives.

SIDELIGHTS:

Historian Jeremy Black covers a wide range of subjects, from the impact of maps to the policies of warfare. "Few historians working today have been as prolific as Jeremy Black," noted Andrew C. Thompson in History: Review of New Books. Black's study Maps and History: Constructing Images of thePast shows the role atlases have played in the presentation and perception of history. "With the rise of nationalism, the growth of European empires, the pushing back of state boundaries in North America and Russia, and the need to teach the ranks of children in new state schools, the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries saw historical atlases flourish," noted Elizabeth Baigent in an English Historical Review article. According to Geographical Journal contributor Dennis Reinhartz, "Black seeks not only to delineate some of the spatial relationships of the past and the importance of their selection in atlases … but also ‘what can be mapped effectively.’"

A companion book, Maps and Politics, shows that the author "has another level of interest in cartography, which diverges sharply from the geographic literature," stated Economic Geography contributor Margaret W. Pearce. Black agrees with established scholars in this field that maps cannot be objective "because good design is governed by a series of choices (e.g. choices of scale, projection, orientation, key, color, title, or caption), and that each of these choices is based on particular assumptions," as Pearce wrote.

To the author, "maps amplify statistical assumptions about society which are questionable," Pearce continued, "and he urges us to remember that social identity depends on the context and scale at which data are interpreted. The solution, he claims, is that social statistics not only cannot, but should not, be mapped." Instead, Black advocates the written word as the key form of communication of such issues. Pearce found Maps and Politics "troubling" in the author's judgment: "It is true that geography at the end of the twentieth century has favored the muscle of the written word over that of the map." Pearce continued: "The result has been an amnesia about what maps can be, not only in the general public, but also in other academic disciplines." Canadian Journal of History critic Michael Wilson found Maps and Politics to be "truly an up-to-date book in that the author takes principled stands (even against some ‘politically correct’ fads of the day) and follows through to the mapped consequences." Geographical Review's Jeremy Crampton wrote that "Black must show that most map users are innocent of the political penumbra of maps and that mapmakers deliberately use maps to further their partisan interests." The author, he declared, "does make half this case, but it is the easier half. The book is tremendously rich in examples of how maps have been used to further particular interests."

Comparing the two volumes, Steve Jolivette in Journal of World History found the themes of Maps and History "frustratingly elusive" but those of Maps and Politics "refreshingly forceful." For readers who wish to understand how politics affect cartography, "this book provides the answers from A to Z." Jolivette summarized that together the two map books "provide a wealth of information on how to look critically at maps and how to avoid being taken in by them, and hence, how to instruct students to do the same."

British foreign policy and warfare are also subjects in Black's canon. In Convergence or Divergence? Britain and the Continent, Black "addresses a subject of longstanding interest to himself," noted Paul Dukes in Journal of European Studies. Black's basic argument is that, as he wrote, "‘the role of individuals and the play of circumstance [were] the most important aspect of governmental activity’" between Britain and Europe for over two thousand years. The author "offers some good insights into the development of English nationalism and how it was nourished by conflict with France," commented Reginald Dale in Europe, "and he concludes with an interesting, though typically British analysis of why a united Europe must not attempt to supersede the nation states, which he believes still to be the most convincing political unit." The book, however, has weaknesses, added Dale, beginning with its "obscure, academic style that uses too many nouns." Matters of style also entered into History Today contributor Philip Mansel's suggestion that the author produced "a reliable, often stimulating chronological survey" in Convergence or Divergence?, though the book "is occasionally marred by a tendency to make lists."

In Why Wars Happen, Black "attempts a broad historical sweep" of five centuries of warfare, according to Paul Rogers in another History Today review. "Black's emphasis is on cultural factors, especially bellicist values, as contributors to war," Rogers commented, adding that the author's "knowledge and breadth of understanding is both impressive and hugely informative, as he explores numerous examples across most continents. His conclusions are sobering in the extreme—that bellicosity is an enduring feature of human culture, even if its intensity may vary across peoples and societies." A companion volume, War and the World: Military Power and the Fate of Continents, 1450-2000, "is even more ambitious a work," declared James Bradford in an article for Armed Forces & Society. Black, he noted, takes fewer than 300 pages to survey the scope of warfare over more than half a millennium, "analyzing the political, social, and cultural causes and consequences of war as well as the strate- gies, tactics, weapons and other resources used to conduct them." Bradford pointed to Black's concentration on the impact of African and Asian nations at war, noting that this view "contrasts sharply with the Eurocentric focus of most military history surveys."

In A New History of England, published in 2000, Black provides a concise history of England over 3,000 years. The author focuses on the most important aspects of this history and the people and trends of various times. Noting the book's short length, Booklist contributor Jay Freeman commented that "it is a surprisingly in-depth examination."

As editor of European Warfare, 1815-2000, Black presents a series of essays by scholars that focus on such topics as developments in military science and equipment, battlefield experiences and lessons, naval warfare, and regional conflicts. "As a learned presentation and analysis of crucial military innovations from the time of smoothbore muskets to the era of ballistic missiles carrying nuclear warheads, Black's compilation deserves a wide readership on college campuses and beyond," commented Eric C. Rust in History: Review of New Books. Eighteenth-Century Britain, 1688-1783 is a general history of Great Britain meant primarily for college students and covers the period beginning with the Glorious Revolution and ending with the American Revolutionary War. "The chapters are compact and easy to follow," noted Andrew C. Thompson in History: Review of New Books. Thompson added: "Black has also made use of his extensive knowledge of European archives to enliven his text with apposite contemporary comment."

Black is coauthor with Donald M. MacRaild of Nineteenth-Century Britain. Despite the book's title, the authors cover British history from the 1730s until the beginning of World War I in 1914. They focus primarily on social and economic issues that impacted British society during that period. "What separates it from other textbooks is that the authors approach the time period in a distinctly social way, and, as a result, political, diplomatic, and institutional histories play secondary and even tertiary roles in telling the story," noted George Mariz in History: Review of New Books. Mariz went on to write in the same review: "This is a book with many strengths."

In his book European International Relations, 1648-1815, Black examines international relations among the European powers of the seventeenth century, as well as Europe's relationship with the rest of the world. Linda Frey, writing in History: Review of New Books, noted that "the work casts new light on a formative period in the development of international relations." Black details how Great Britain's maritime strength was the foundation for its rise as world power and for its colonial empire in his book The British Seaborne Empire. Going back to the Middle Ages, Black details the development of the British navy and goes on to chart its eventual decline, along with the British Empire, beginning in World War I. "When reading the book, it is a good idea to have a globe next to you, preferably one of those old Victorian ones where everything British is marked in red," noted Henrik Bering in the Weekly Standard.

In A Military History of Britain: From 1775 to the Present, Black focuses both on specific conflicts as well as on the British military structure and culture over more than two centuries. Among the battles and wars discussed are the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812 with the United States. A Reference & Research Book News contributor noted that Black "chooses some surprising topics to follow." David Lee Poremba, writing in the Library Journal, referred to A Military History of Britain as a "concise and comprehensive military history."

Black's George III: America's Last King was referred to by Library Journal contributor Matt Todd as "a magisterial new treatment of George's life (1760-1820), exploring his long and eventful reign." In his book, Black compares George III with other rulers of the day and examines the various moral and cultural influences that shaped the English ruler. He also explores the Revolutionary War in America as the most important event in King George III's reign. Jonathan Clark, writing in the Spectator, noted that "George's stock steadily rises in this learned biography" and added: "George emerges with positive virtues, as well as political failings."

Black turns his focus to the United States with Altered States: America since the Sixties. "This is a balanced and comprehensive introduction to modern America, replete with eye-catching statistics," noted A.D. Harvey in Contemporary Review. In addition to its statistical look at how the United States has changed since the 1960s—for example, the book points out that in 1970 America imported thirty-four percent of its oil compared to fifty-eight percent in 2004—Black also examines how the United States has evolved socially, politically, and economically. Noting that "up-to-dateness … wears out pretty quickly," Harvey nevertheless added that the history "has an enduring quality, for which it will deserve to be cited in decades to come."

In his 2007 book, The Slave Trade, Black looks at the origins and history of the slave trade in Western countries and explores how it eventually met its demise. Among the issues the author covers are the constant uprisings that resulted from slavery and how the rise of capitalism, the middle class, and the need for a free labor source played an important part in eventually ending slavery. "He has a vast knowledge of his subject and contrives to pack much fascinating information into a short text," noted Dennis O'Keeffe in Quadrant. Black is also editor of the four-volume The Atlantic Slave Trade, which begins with a volume covering the trade's origins and its history up to 1600 followed by volumes on the seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century slave trade.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

BOOKS

Black, Jeremy, Convergence or Divergence? Britain and the Continent, Centre for European Studies, University of Durham (Durham, England), 1992.

PERIODICALS

Air & Space Power Journal, summer, 2003, Stephen A. Bourque, review of European Warfare, 1815-2000, p. 111; summer, 2003, Col Eric Ash, review of Warfare in the Western World, 1882-1975, p. 107.

Air Power History, fall, 2003, Jim Gates, review of America as a Military Power, 1775-1865, p. 46.

Albion, fall, 1994, review of The Politics of Britain, 1688-1800, p. 516; winter, 1997, review of A History of the British Isles, p. 643; spring, 2002, Karl W. Schweizer, review of British Diplomats and Diplomacy, 1688-1800, p. 102; winter, 2002, Reed Browning, review of Eighteenth-Century Britain, 1688-1783, p. 653; summer, 2004, Tamara L. Hunt, review of Nineteenth-Century Britain, p. 322.

American Historical Review, April, 1994, James J. Sack, review of Pitt the Elder, p. 557; June, 1995, Bernard Semmel, review of Convergence or Divergence? Britain and the Continent, p. 895; April, 1999, David Ralston, review of War and the World: Military Power and the Fate of Continents, 1450-2000, p. 538.

Annals of the Association of American Geographers, September, 2000, Patrick McHaffie, review of Maps and Politics, p. 647.

Armed Forces & Society, winter, 2001, James Bradford, reviews of Why Wars Happen and War and the World, p. 295.

Booklist, July, 1996, Brad Hooper, review of A History of the British Isles, p. 1798; June 1, 2000, Jay Freeman, review of A New History of England, p. 1841; February 1, 2006, Gilbert Taylor, review of The Seventy Great Battles in History, p. 11; December 15, 2006, Gilbert Taylor, review of A Military History of Britain: From 1775 to the Present, p. 7.

Canadian Journal of History, December, 1993, Donna Andrew, review of The British Abroad: The Grand Tour in the Eighteenth Century, p. 587; December, 1999, Hubert Johnson, review of War and the World, p. 512; April, 2000, Michael Wilson, reviews of Maps and History: Constructing Images of the Past and Maps and Politics, p. 209; August, 2000, Stephen Conway, review of Britain as a Military Power, 1688-1815, p. 323; April, 2003, Simon Deveraux, review of Eighteenth-Century Britain, 1688-1783, p. 108; spring-summer, 2006, Mark F. Proudman, review of The Hanoverians: The History of a Dynasty, p. 126; winter, 2006, Douglas M. Peers, review of The British Seaborne Empire, p. 630.

Choice, June, 1992, L.E. Babits, review of War for America: The Fight for Independence, 1775-1783, p. 1601; July-August, 1998, G.B. Osborne, review of Maps and Politics, p. 1905; October, 1998, G.B. Osborne, review of War and the World, p. 386; May, 1999, R.A. Garnett, reviews of Why Wars Happen and War and the World, p. 538; September, 1999, P.D. Jones, review of Britain as a Military Power, 1688-1815, p. 220.

Contemporary Review, May, 2001, review of The English Press, 1621-1861, p. 318; April, 2002, review of Walpole in Power, p. 252; February, 2004, review of World War Two, p. 123; May, 2004, review of Visions of the World: A History of Maps, p. 315; August, 2004, review of Parliament and Foreign Policy in the Eighteenth Century, p. 124; March, 2005, review of The British Seaborne Empire, p. 188; summer, 2007, A.D. Harvey, review of Altered States: America since the Sixties, p. 245.

Economic Geography, July, 2000, Margaret Pearce, review of Maps and Politics, p. 295.

Economist, November 15, 1997, review of Maps and Politics, p. S5.

Eighteenth Century Studies, spring, 1993, Edward Gregg, review of Culloden and the '45, p. 506.

English Historical Review, July, 1992, G.C. Gibbs, review of Knights Errant and True Englishmen: British Foreign Policy, 1660-1800, p. 728; October, 1993, H.M. Scott, review of The Rise of the European Powers, 1679-1793, p. 1034; February, 1994, M.S. Anderson, review of Eighteenth-Century Europe, 1700-1789, p. 197; June, 1994, Bruce P. Lenman, review of Culloden and the '45, p. 737; November, 1994, Peter D.G. Thomas, review of War for America, p. 1289; February, 1996, Bob Harris, review of Pitt the Elder, p. 206; November, 1996, John Cannon, review of British Foreign Policy in an Age of Revolutions, 1783-1793, p. 1300; September, 1998, W.A. Speck, review of Culture and Society in Britain, 1660-1800, p. 1000; April, 1999, Richard Middleton, review of America or Europe? British Foreign Policy, 1739-1763, p. 455; June, 1999, Peter Wilson, review of Why Wars Happen, p. 802; February, 2000, Daniel Szechi, review of Britain as a Military Power, 1688-1815, p. 210; April, 2001, Elizabeth Baigent, review of Maps and History, p. 441, Peter Beck, review of Modern British History since 1900, p. 516; September, 2001, Elizabeth Baigent, review of Historical Atlas of Britain: The End of the Middle Ages to the Georgian Era, p. 955; February, 2004, Michael Howard, review of World War Two, p. 257; June, 2004, Glyn Williams, review of Europe and the World, 1650-1830, p. 797.

Europe, October, 1994, Reginald Dale, review of Convergence or Divergence?, p. 47.

European History Quarterly, October, 1992, John Miller, review of Eighteenth-Century Europe, 1700-1789, p. 626; April, 1994, R.A. Stradling, review of A Military Revolution? Military Change and European Society, 1550-1800, p. 271; April, l996, Jennifer Mori, review of British Foreign Policy in an Age of Revolutions, 1783-1793, p. 320; July, 1999, Mori, review of America or Europe?, p. 434.

Geographical Journal, December, 2000, Dennis Reinhartz, review of Maps and History, p. 374.

Geographical Review, July, 1998, Jeremy Crampton, review of Maps and Politics, p. 453.

Guardian Weekly, November 15, 1992, review of The British Abroad, p. 29.

Historian, summer, 1995, Charles Johnston, review of The British Abroad, p. 577, and Matthew Berg, review of Convergence or Divergence?, p. 821; spring, 1996, John M. Dougherty, review of European Warfare, 1453-1815, p. 674; spring, 1999, James Sack, review of The British Abroad, p. 706; winter, 2000, S.P. MacKenzie, review of War and the World, p. 468; summer, 2005, Charles H. Ford, review of Italy and the Grand Tour, p. 345; winter, 2005, James J. Sack, review of Parliament and Foreign Policy in the Eighteenth Century, p. 786.

Historical Journal, June, 1992, H.M. Scott, review of Natural and Necessary Enemies: Anglo-French Relations in the Eighteenth Century and British Foreign Policy in the Age of Walpole, p. 443; September, 1994, Jim Smyth, review of Pitt the Elder, p. 697.

History, June, 1992, F.R. Bridge, review of A System of Ambition? British Foreign Policy, 1660-1793 and The Rise of The European Powers, 1679-1793, p. 324; October, 1992, Philip Haffenden, review of War for America, p. 439; October, 1994, Ian Harris, review of Pitt the Elder, p. 501; February, 1995, Bob Harris, review of The Politics of Britain, 1688-1800, p. 137; April, 1996, Emma Vincent, review of British Foreign Policy in an Age of Revolutions, 1783-1793, p. 279; April, 1998, John Childs, review of Cambridge Illustrated Atlas of Warfare: Renaissance to Revolution, 1492-1792, p. 314, Stephen Lee, review of An Illustrated History of Eighteenth-Century Britain, 1688-1793, p. 340; January, 2000, Childs, review of War and the World, p. 277; April, 2000, Christoph Schroer, review of America or Europe?, p. 353.

History Review, December, 1996, Richard Harding, review of Cambridge Illustrated Atlas of Warfare, p. 51.

History: Review of New Books, fall, 1999, John Beeler, review of Britain as a Military Power, 1688-1815, p. 14; spring, 2002, Andrew C. Thompson, review of Eighteenth-Century Britain, 1688-1783, p. 108; fall, 2002, Eric C. Rust, review of European Warfare, 1815-2000, p. 27; fall, 2003, George Mariz, review of Nineteenth-Century Britain, p. 16; fall, 2004, Robert Zaller, review of Parliament and Foreign Policy in the Eighteenth Century, p. 21; summer, 2005, Ronald H. Fritze, review of Using History; p. 162; fall, 2005, Jonathan M. House, review of War since 1945, p. 28.

History Today, February, 1994, Steven Praissien, review of The British Abroad, p. 50; November, 1994, Frank O'Gorman, reviews of Pitt the Elder and The Politics of Britain, 1688-1800, p. 56; July, 1995, Geoffrey Best, review of European Warfare, 1660-1815, p. 51; January, 1996, Philip Mansel, review of Convergence or Divergence?, p. 58; August, 1998, Paul Rogers, review of Why Wars Happen, p. 59; September, 2004, Tim Wilks, review of Italy and the Grand Tour, p. 59; December, 2004, David Johnson, review of The Hanoverians, p. 56; April, 2005, "Black Books: Daniel Snowman Meets Jeremy Black, Prolific Chronicler of British, European and Worldwide Diplomatic, Military, Cultural and Cartographic History, and Much Else Besides," p. 34; May, 2005, John MacKenzie, review of The British Seaborne Empire, p. 72; February, 2007, Andrew Roberts, review of George III: America's Last King, p. 61; August, 2007, "The Curse of History: Historian Jeremy Black Reflects on the Challenges, Ambiguities and Dangers Arising from the Present Tendency of Political and Religious Groupings to Locate Their Grievances in the Past," p. 38.

International History Review, December, 1998, John Agnew, review of Maps and History, p. 937; September, 1999, Peter C. Perdue, review of Maps and Politics, p. 714; December, 1999, Roger Beaumont, review of War and the World, p. 969.

International Review of History, August, 1997, Charles Ingrao, review of Cambridge Illustrated Atlas of Warfare, p. 660.

Isis, March, 2000, Michael Curry, review of Maps and History, p. 131.

Journal of African History, July, 2000, Anthony Clayton, review of War and Warfare, p. 318.

Journal of American History, September, 2000, James P. Ackerman, review of Maps and Politics, p. 628.

Journal of European Studies, December, 1992, A.G. Cross, review of The British Abroad, p. 360; March, 1995, Paul Dukes, review of Convergence or Divergence?, p. 69; December, 1999, Christopher Todd, review of From Louis XIV to Napoleon: The Fate of a Great Power, p. 444.

Journal of Historical Geography, April, 1998, Miles Ogborn, reviews of Culture and Society in Britain, 1660-1800 and An Illustrated History of Eighteenth-Century Britain, 1688-1793, p. 218; January, 1999, John Long, review of Maps and History, p. 101, and Matthew Edney, review of Maps and Politics, p. 103.

Journal of Interdisciplinary History, summer, 1999, Lesley Cormack, review of Maps and History, p. 101; summer, 2001, Elizabeth Stanley-Mitchell, review of Why Wars Happen, p. 103.

Journal of Military History, January, 1994, Thomas Davis, review of Pitt the Elder, p. 144; July, 1995, John A. Lynn, review of European Warfare, 1660-1815, p. 525; January, 1997, Brett D. Steele, review of Cambridge Illustrated Atlas of Warfare, p. 151; April, 1998, Norman Thrower, review of Maps and History, p. 387; April, 1999, Paul Kennedy, review of Why Wars Happen, p. 429; July, 1999, Earl A. Reitan, review of Britain as a Military Power, 1688-1815, p. 714.

Journal of Modern History, September, 1997, Gunther Rothenberg, review of British Foreign Policy in an Age of Revolutions, 1783-1793, p. 587; December, 1999, John Agnew, reviews of Maps and History and Maps and Politics, p. 916.

Journal of Politics, November, 1999, Stephen Rock, review of Why Wars Happen, p. 1233; August, 2000, Andrew Katz, review of War and the World, p. 916.

Journal of World History, spring, 2000, Steve Jolivette, reviews of Maps and History and Maps and Politics, p. 115; December, 2006, Jefferson P. Marquis, review of War since 1945, p. 461.

Library Journal, March 1, 1997, Marilyn Dailey, review of An Illustrated History of Eighteenth-Century Britain, 1688-1793, p. 86; December 1, 2006, Matt Todd, review of George III, p. 133; January 1, 2007, David Lee Poremba, review of A Military History of Britain, p. 121.

Magazine Antiques, February, 2004, review of Italy and the Grand Tour, p. 54.

Military Review, May-June, 2005, Michael A. Boden, review of War in the Modern World, 1815-2000, p. 105; July-August, 2005, Michael A. Boden, review of War in the Modern World, 1815-2000, p. 97.

Natural History, April, 1998, review of Maps and History, p. 11.

Naval War College Review, summer, 2006, John B. Hattendorf, review of The British Seaborne Empire, p. 156.

New Statesman, September 20, 1996, Christopher Harvie, review of A History of the British Isles, p. 44.

New Yorker, November 16, 1998, review of Maps and Politics, p. 20.

Quadrant, April, 2007, Dennis O'Keeffe, "On Not Apologising Too Slavishly," review of The Slave Trade, p. 85.

Reference & Research Book News, November, 2005, review of Warfare in Europe, 1650-1792; February, 2006, review of Introduction to Global Military History: 1775 to the Present Day; May, 2006, review of The Age of Total War, 1860-1945; November, 2006, review of Revolutions in the Western World, 1775-1825; February, 2007, reviews of A Military History of Britain, The Atlantic Slave Trade, Volumes 1-4, and War in European History, 1494-1660: The Essential Bibliography.

Renaissance Quarterly, spring, 1998, Rand Burnette, review of Cambridge Illustrated Atlas of Warfare, p. 205.

Technology and Culture, July, 1999, Josef Konvitz, review of Maps and Politics, p. 650.

Sewanee Review, fall, 2000, George Garrett, review of War and the World, p. CVI.

Sixteenth Century Journal, spring, 1993, Frederic J. Baumgartner, review of A Military Revolution?, p. 164; winter, 1996, Thomas F. Arnold, review of Cambridge Illustrated Atlas of Warfare, p. 1116; winter, 1998, Brian P. Levack, review of A History of the British Isles, p. 1189.

Spectator, August 30, 1997, Jonathan Clark, review of Maps and History, p. 29; April 18, 1998, Michael Howard, reviews of War and the World and Why Wars Happen, p. 31; March 3, 2007, "A Driving Sense of Duty."

Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, summer, 1998, Donna Landry and Gerald Maclean, review of The British Abroad, p. 553.

Symploke, winter-spring, 2005, Skip Willman, review of The Politics of James Bond: From Fleming's Novels to the Big Screen, p. 350.

Teaching History: A Journal of Methods, fall, 2004, Raymond J. Jirran, review of European Warfare, 1815-2000, p. 95.

Times Educational Supplement, August 21, 1992, Julia Neuberger, review of The British Abroad, p. 19; September 20, 1996, Ronald Hutton, review of A History of the British Isles, p. B8.

Times Higher Education Supplement, October, 30, 1992, Muriel E. Chamberlain, review of The British Abroad, p. 1043; April 17, 1998, Brendan Simms, review of America or Europe?, p. 26; August 14, 1998, Tim Garden, review of Why Wars Happen, p. 1345; February 26, 1999, Harriet Swain, "A Career in Several Volumes," p. S2; April 27, 2001, Susan Gole, review of Maps and Politics, p. 31.

Times Literary Supplement, July 27-August 2, 1990, William Doyle, review of Eighteenth-Century Europe, 1700-1789, p. 806; January 24, 1992, review of War for America, p. 25; May 21, 1993, Peter Thomas, review of Pitt the Elder, p. 28; July 2, 1995, Gile Radice, review of Convergence or Divergence?, p. 31; February 14, 1997, Keith Brown, review of A History of the British Isles, p. 29; July 10, 1998, Sarah Tyacke, review of Maps and History, p. 27; August, 7, 1998, Hew Strachan, review of War and the World, p. 23; September 11, 1998, Nicholas Crane, review of Maps and Politics, p. 5.

Virginia Quarterly Review, winter, 1999, review of War and the World, p. 7.

Weekly Standard, February 7, 2005, "Ruling the Waves: Why Britons Never, Never, Never Were Slaves," p. 35.

ONLINE

Foreign Policy Research Institute,http://www.fpri.org/ (January 22, 2008), brief profile of author.

University of Exeter Web site,http://www.huss.ex.ac.uk/ (February 22, 2008), faculty profile of author.

[Sketch reviewed by Deanne Freer.]

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Black, Jeremy 1955–." Contemporary Authors, New Revision Series. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Black, Jeremy 1955–." Contemporary Authors, New Revision Series. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 13, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/black-jeremy-1955

"Black, Jeremy 1955–." Contemporary Authors, New Revision Series. . Retrieved November 13, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/black-jeremy-1955

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.