Mamangakis, Nikos

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Mamangakis, Nikos

Mamangakis, Nikos, Greek composer; b. Rethymnon, Crete, March 3, 1929. He studied at the Hellikon Cons. in Athens (1947–53); then composition with Orff and Genzmer at the Hochschule für Musik in Munich (1957–61) and electronic music at the Siemens Studio in Munich (1961–64). His works reflect modern quasi-mathematical procedures, with numerical transformations determining pitch, rhythm, and form.

Works

Music for 4 Protagonists for 4 Voices and 10 Instrumentalists, after Kazantzakis (1959–60); Constructions for Flute and Percussion (1959–60); Combinations for Solo Percussionist and Orch. (1961); Speech Symbols for Soprano, Bass, and Orch. (1961–62); “Cycle of Numbers”: No. 1, Monologue, for Cello (1962), No. 2, Antagonisms, for Cello and 1 Percussionist moving in an arc along the stage (1963), No. 3, Trittys (Triad), for Guitar, 2 Double Basses, Santouri, and Percussion (1966), and No. 4, Tetraktys, for String Quartet (1963–66); Kassandra for Soprano and 6 Performers (1963); Erotokritos, ballad for 3 Voices and 5 Instruments (1964); Ploutos, popular opera after Aristophanes (1966); Theama-Akroama, visual-auditive event (happening) for Actor, Dancer, Painter, Singer, and 8 Instruments (Athens, April 3,1967); Scenario for 2 Improvised Art Critics for Voice, Instruments, and Tape (1968); Antinomies for Voice, Flute, Electric Double Bass, 2 Harps, 4 Cellos, 2 Percussionists, Hammond Organ, 4 Basses, and 4 Sopranos (Athens, Dec. 18, 1968); Bolivar, folk cantata in pop-art style (1968); The Bacchants, electronic ballet (1969); Parastasis for various Flutes, Voice, and Tape (1969); Askesis for Cello (1969–70); Perilepsis for Flute (1970); Erophili, popular opera (1970); Anarchia for Solo Percussion and Orch. (Donaueschingen, Oct. 16, 1971); Penthima, in memory of Jani Christou, for Guitar (1970–71); Monologue II for Violin and Tape (1971); Kykeon for several Solo Instruments (1972); Olophyrmos for Tape (1973); Folk Liturgy for Women’s Voices and Chamber Ensemble (1976).

—Nicolas Slonimsky/Laura Kuhn/Dennis McIntire

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