Nicks, Stevie (1948–)

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Nicks, Stevie (1948–)

American rock singer and composer. Born Stephanie Lynn Nicks, May 26, 1948, in Phoenix, AZ; m. Kim Anderson (div.).

With Lindsay Buckingham and 2 others, formed the Fritz Raybyne Memorial Band in high school, then began performing professionally with the band in college, opening in San Francisco rock clubs for such acts as Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix (mid-1960s); with Buckingham, signed a deal with Polydor Records (1973) and released what came to be known as The Buckingham-Nicks Album; with Buckingham, asked to join Fleetwood Mac (Mick Fleetwood, Peter Green, John McVie, Christie McVie); along with Christie, was one of the band's two lead singers, helping to form the distinctive sound that became one of rock's most influential groups for 2 decades; wrote the bands only song to reach #1 in US, "Dreams", as well as one of its most durable hits, "Rhiannon" (1975); released 1st solo album, Bella Donna, while continuing to tour with band; broke with Fleetwood Mac (1991); pursued a solo career as songwriter and performer, her work noted for its mystical overtones and complex lyrics (1991–97); reunited with Fleetwood Mac (1997–98) for Rumours tour. With band, inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (1998).

See also Edward Wincenstein, Stevie Nicks, Rock's Mystical Lady (Momentary Pleasures, 1993); and Women in World History.

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Nicks, Stevie (1948–)

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