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Officer

OFFICER

An individual with the responsibility of performing the duties and functions of an office, that is a duty or charge, a position of trust, or a right to exercise a public or private employment.

A public officer is ordinarily defined as an individual who has been elected or appointed to exercise the functions of an office for the benefit of the public. Executive officers, such as the president or state governors, are public officers charged with the duty to ascertain that the law is enforced and obeyed. A legislative officer, such as a member of Congress, has the duty of making the laws. A public officer whose duties include administering justice, adjudicating controversies, and interpreting the laws is called a judicial officer. A de jure officer is one who is legally appointed and qualified to exercise the office. A de facto officer is an individual who appears to be legally qualified and appointed to an office but is not due to some legal technicality, such as failure to file a financial disclosure statement within the time prescribed by statute.

A public office must be created either by statute or by constitutional provision. Public officers are distinguishable from employees in that they are required to take an oath of office and are appointed or elected to specified terms of office. The eligibility, duties, and compensation of public officers are defined by statute.

Removal from office occurs when an officer is dismissed from his or her position by a superior officer acting according to law. Sufficient cause must exist to justify the removal. When an individual is wrongfully removed from office, he or she may seek reinstatement.

A military officer is one who has been commissioned as such in the armed services.

An officer of a corporation is someone, such as the president, vice-president, treasurer, or secretary, whose main duties are to oversee the efficient operation of the business.

cross-references

Officers of the Court.

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officer

of·fi·cer / ˈôfisər; ˈäf-/ • n. 1. a person holding a position of command or authority in the armed services, in the merchant marine, or on a passenger ship. ∎  a policeman or policewoman. ∎  a bailiff. 2. a holder of a public, civil, or ecclesiastical office: a probation officer | the chief medical officer. ∎  a holder of a post in a society, company, or other organization, esp. one who is involved at a senior level in its management: a chief executive officer. 3. a member of a certain grade in some honorary orders. • v. [tr.] provide with military officers: the aristocracy continued to wield considerable political power, officering the army. ∎  act as the commander of (a unit): foreign mercenaries were hired to officer new regiments.

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officer

officerAlissa, Clarissa, kisser, Larissa, Marisa, Melissa, Orissa, reminiscer •fixer, mixer, sixer •convincer, mincer, pincer, rinser, wincer •Amritsar, Maritsa, spritzer •howitzer • kibitzer • purchaser •artificer • officer • surfacer • Pulitzer •Wurlitzer • promiser • harnesser •menacer •practiser (US practicer) •de-icer, dicer, enticer, gricer, paise, pricer, ricer, slicer, splicer •Schweitzer •Barbarossa, dosser, embosser, fossa, glosser, josser, Ossa, Saragossa, tosser •boxer • sponsor • matzo • bobbysoxer •Chaucer, courser, endorser (US indorser), enforcer, forcer, reinforcer, saucer, Xhosa •balsa, waltzer •dowser, grouser, Hausa, mouser, Scouser •announcer, bouncer, denouncer, pouncer, pronouncer, renouncer, trouncer •schnauzer

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