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Atlantic Charter

ATLANTIC CHARTER

ATLANTIC CHARTER was signed 14 August 1941, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Great Britain at a meeting in Argentia Bay off the coast of Newfoundland. The United States, still technically neutral in World War II, had already taken a number of steps that brought it closer to war. The charter resembled President Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points in that both declarations expressed idealistic objectives for a postwar world. The charter included the following points: the renunciation of territorial aggrandizement; opposition to territorial changes not approved by the people concerned; the right of people to choose their own form of government; equal access to trade and raw materials of the world; promotion of economic advancement, improved labor standards, and social security; freedom from fear and want; freedom of the seas; and disarmament of aggressor nations pending the establishment of a permanent system of peace.

Although only a press release as first issued, the charter was nonetheless well understood to be a pronouncement of considerable significance. It acquired further authority when, on 1 January 1942, twenty-six countries (including the United States and Great Britain) signed the United Nations Declaration, which included among its provisions formal endorsement of the charter.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Dallek, Robert. Franklin D. Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy, 1932–1945. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979.

Kimball, Warren F. Forged in War: Roosevelt, Churchill, and the Second World War. New York: Morrow, 1997.

Charles S.Campbell/a. g.

See alsoFour Freedoms ; Great Britain, Relations with ; Treaties with Foreign Nations .

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Atlantic charter

Atlantic charter. This was drawn up at the first of the Churchill– Roosevelt wartime meetings (9–12 August 1941) during one of the darkest periods of the war. Above all a political gesture and propaganda exercise, the charter had less effect on American isolationists than hoped. The two powers renounced territorial aggrandizement; condemned territorial changes contrary to the wishes of the people concerned; pledged that peoples should be free to choose their own form of government, and to live in freedom from want and fear. The two leaders were not in entire agreement. Churchill insisted on qualifying American proposals to guarantee equal access to the world's riches to ‘all States, great or small’ by calling for ‘due respect for … existing obligations’ within the empire. Roosevelt for his part diluted Churchill's plea for an ‘effective’ post-war international organization by agreeing to no more than the ultimate ‘establishment of a wider and permanent system of general security’. A British bid for Soviet endorsement elicited only a vague statement of approval.

C. J. Bartlett

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Atlantic Charter

Atlantic Charter (ətlătĬk, ăt–), joint program of peace aims, enunciated by Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Great Britain and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt of the United States on Aug. 14, 1941. Britain at that time was engaged in World War II, and the United States was to enter the war four months later. The statement, which was not an official document, was drawn up at sea, off the coast of Newfoundland. It supported the following principles and aims: renunciation of territorial aggrandizement; opposition to territorial changes made against the wishes of the people concerned; restoration of sovereign rights and self-government to those forcibly deprived of them; access to raw materials for all nations of the world and easing of trade restrictions; world cooperation to secure improved economic and social conditions for all; freedom from fear and want; freedom of the seas; and abandonment of the use of force, as well as disarmament of aggressor nations. In the United Nations declaration of Jan. 1, 1942, the signatory powers pledged adherence to the principles of the charter.

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Atlantic Charter

Atlantic Charter Joint declaration of peace aims issued in August 1941 by US President Franklin Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. It affirmed the right of all nations to choose their own form of government, promised to restore sovereignty to all nations, and advocated the disarmament of aggressor nations.

http://state.gov/usa/infousa/facts/democrac/53.htm

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