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Carnall, Rudolf von

Carnall, Rudolf von

(b. Glatz, Germany [now Klodzko, Poland], 9 February 1804; d. Breslau, Germany [now Wroclaw, Poland], 17 November 1874),

geology.

Carnall was trained to be a Prussian civil mining engineer. After working underground for one year in various mines, he studied in Berlin; he then wasappointed Bergassessor to Upper Silesia, where he lectured on mining science at the Bergschule at Tarnowitz. In 1845 he went to Bonn as Oberbergrat, and soon afterward returned to Berlin, where with Leopold von Buch and Gustav Rose, he initiated the Deutsche Geologische Gesellschaft. As an administrative officer of the mining department he was in charge of the Prussian Knappschaftsordnung, which regulations still govern much of the German mining industry. He simultaneously lectured at the University of Berlin until 1855, when he took the Ph.D. there. In 1854 he became a Referent in the Prussian ministry of commerce and in 1855 was promoted to Berghauptmann.

His scientific work was diverse. He founded the official German mining journal, which (until 1945) published important papers on administrative, technical, mining, and geological problems. His scientific publications include Der bergmannische Streb hau auf der Bleierzgrube Friedrich bei Tarnowitz; “Geognostische Beschreibung von einem Teil des Nieder- undOberse hlesischen Gebirges,” a geognostic description of a part of the mountains of Lower and Upper Silesia, which was published in Karstens Archiv fur Mineralogie; Oeognostischer Vergleich zwischen Niederund Oberschlesischen Gebirgsformationen, a geognostical comparison between the Lower and Upper Silesian formations; and Sprunge im Steinkohlenge birge (1835), which dealt with faults in the Carboniferous era. Heinrich Rose named the mineral carnallite after him.

P. Ramdohr

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