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angle

an·gle1 / ˈanggəl/ • n. 1. the space (usually measured in degrees) between two intersecting lines or surfaces at or close to the point where they meet. ∎  a corner, esp. an external projection or an internal recess of a part of a building or other structure: a skylight in the angle of the roof. ∎  slope; a measure of the inclination of two lines or surfaces with respect to each other, equal to the amount that one would have to be turned in order to point in the same direction as the other: sloping at an angle of 33° to the horizontal. ∎  a position from which something is viewed or along which it travels or acts, often as measured by its inclination from an implicit horizontal or vertical baseline: camera angles. 2. a particular way of approaching or considering an issue or problem: discussing the problems from every conceivable angle. ∎  one part of a larger subject, event, or problem: a black prosecutor who downplayed the racial angle. ∎  a bias or point of view: Zimmer saw the world from an angle that few could understand. 3. Astrol. each of the four mundane houses (the first, fourth, seventh, and tenth of the twelve divisions of the heavens) that extend counterclockwise from the cardinal points of the compass. • v. [tr.] direct or incline at an angle: Anna angled her camera toward the tree. ∎  [intr.] move or be inclined at an angle: the cab angled across two lanes and skidded to a stop. ∎  [tr.] present (information) to reflect a particular view or have a particular focus. PHRASES: at an angle in a direction or at an inclination markedly different from parallel, vertical, or horizontal with respect to an implicit baseline: she wore her beret at an angle. from all angles from every direction or point of view: looking at the problem from all angles.

angles

an·gle2 • v. [intr.] fish with rod and line: there are no big fish left to angle for. ∎  seek something desired by indirectly prompting someone to offer it: Ralph had begun to angle for an invitation. • n. archaic a fishhook.

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angle

angle, in mathematics, figure formed by the intersection of two straight lines; the lines are called the sides of the angle and their point of intersection the vertex of the angle. Angles are commonly measured in degrees (°) or in radians. If one side and the vertex of an angle are fixed and the other side is rotated about the vertex, it sweeps out a complete circle of 360° or 2π radians with each complete rotation. Half a rotation from 0° or 0 radians results in a straight angle, equal to 180° or π radians; the sides of a straight angle form a straight line. A quarter rotation (half of a straight angle) results in a right angle, equal to 90° or π/2 radians; the sides of a right angle are perpendicular to one another. An angle less than a right angle is acute, and an angle greater than a right angle is obtuse. Two angles that add up to a right angle are complementary. Two angles that add up to a straight angle are supplementary. One of the geometric problems of antiquity is the trisection of an angle. Angles can also be formed by higher–dimensional figures, as by a line and a plane, or by two intersecting planes.

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Angle

Angle a member of a Germanic people, originally inhabitants of what is now Schleswig-Holstein, who came to England in the 5th century ad. The Angles founded kingdoms in Mercia, Northumbria, and East Anglia and gave their name to England and the English.

The name comes from Latin Angli ‘the people of Angul’, a district of Schleswig (now in northern Germany), so named because of its angular shape.
not Angles but Angels comment attributed to Gregory the Great (ad c.540–604), on seeing fair-haired English slaves in Rome; the story is oral tradition, based on Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica.

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angle

angle Measure of the inclination of two straight lines or planes to each other. One complete revolution is divided into 360 degrees or 2π radians. One degree may be subdivided into 60 minutes, and one minute into 60 seconds.

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Angle

An·gle / ˈanggəl/ • n. a member of a Germanic people, originally inhabitants of what is now Schleswig-Holstein, who migrated to England in the 5th century ad.

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angle

angle2 space between two meeting lines or planes. XIV. — (O)F. angle or L. angulus corner (cf. Gr. agkúlos bent, arched, ágkūra ANCHOR) see ANKLE.

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angle

angle1 (arch.) fishing-hook. OE. angel = OS., OHG. angul (Du., G. angel), ON. ǫngull; f. Gmc. *aŋg (cf. next).
Hence angle vb. XV. angler XIV.

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Angle

Angle one of a Gmc. tribe that settled in Britain. XVIII. — L. Anglus, pl. Anglī, in Tacitus Angliī — Gmc. *Aŋgli- (whence OE. Engle; cf. ENGLISH) the people of Angul district of Schleswig so called from its shape (mod. Angeln), the same word as ANGLE1.
Hence Anglian XVIII.

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