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paste

paste / pāst/ • n. a thick, soft, moist substance, usually produced by mixing dry ingredients with a liquid: blend onions, sugar, and oil to a paste. ∎  a substance such as this that is used as an adhesive, esp. for sticking paper and other light materials: wallpaper paste. ∎  a mixture consisting mainly of clay and water that is used in making ceramic ware, esp. a mixture of low plasticity based on kaolin for making porcelain. ∎  a hard vitreous composition used in making imitation gems: [as adj.] paste brooches. • v. [tr.] 1. coat with paste: when coating walls with fabric, paste the wall, not the fabric. ∎  [tr.] fasten or stick (something) onto something with paste: ads are pasted on the walls. ∎  Comput. insert (text) into a document. 2. inf. beat or defeat severely: he pasted the guy and tied his ankles together.

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"paste." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"paste." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 19, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/paste-0

"paste." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 19, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/paste-0

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paste

paste flour moistened and kneaded XIV; mixture of flour and water used as a glue XVI; applied to various other mixtures XVII. — OF. paste (mod. pâte) = Sp., It. pasta :- late L. pasta small square piece of a medicinal preparation — Gr. pástē, pl. pastá, pastaí barley porridge, sb. uses of pastós sprinkled, f. pássein sprinkle.
Hence paste vb. XVI. pasteboard material made by pasting sheets of paper together XVI. pasty1 (-Y1) like paste. XVII.

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"paste." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"paste." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 19, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/paste-1

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paste

paste To insert the contents of the clipboard or the paste buffer into a text or graphics object at a desired point.

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"paste." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"paste." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved December 19, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/paste

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American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

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paste

pastebarefaced, baste, boldfaced, chaste, haste, lambaste, paste, po-faced, red-faced, self-faced, shamefaced, smooth-faced, strait-laced, taste, unplaced, untraced, waist, waste •toothpaste • foretaste • aftertaste •shirtwaist

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"paste." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 19, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/paste

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Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

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http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.