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child

child a child on a boar is the emblem of St Cyricus.
the child is the father of the man asserting the unity of character from childhood to adult life. The saying comes originally from a line in Wordsworth's ‘My heart leaps up when I behold’ (1807), ‘the Child is father of the Man’, but a similar idea is found in Milton's Paradise Regained (1671), ‘The childhood shows the man.’
Monday's child is fair of face first line of a traditional rhyme associating the day on which someone is born with particular qualities, recorded from the mid 19th century. Individual lines are often used separately, and the complete verse runs: ‘Monday's child is fair of face, Tuesday's child is full of grace, Wednesday's child is full of woe, Thursday's child has far to go, Friday's child is loving and giving, Saturday's child works hard for his living, And the child that is born of the Sabbath day, Is bonny, and blithe, and good and gay.’

See also children.

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child

child / chīld/ • n. (pl. chil·dren / ˈchildrən/ ) a young human being below the age of full physical development or below the legal age of majority. ∎  a son or daughter of any age. ∎  an immature or irresponsible person. ∎  a person who has little or no experience in a particular area. ∎  (children) the descendants of a family or people. ∎  (child of) a person or thing influenced by a specified environment: a child of the sixties. PHRASES: child's play a task that is easily accomplished. from a child since childhood. with child formal pregnant.DERIVATIVES: child·less adj. child·less·ness n.

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child

child A word peculiar to English. OE. ċild :- *kilþam, rel. to Goth. kilþei womb, inkilþō pregnant; OSw. kulder, kolder (Sw. kull), ODa. kol(l). Da. kuld, young of a litter, child, have been compared. The nom. pl. of OE. ċild appears as ċild and ċildru (ME. childre, mod. dial. childer); the addition of the weak pl. ending -(e)n produced the surviving standard pl. children (XII).

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child

child Any node in a tree, except the root. Every child thus has a parent.

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child

childchild, Childe, mild, self-styled, undefiled, wild, Wilde •grandchild • stepchild • brainchild •godchild • Rothschild • schoolchild •love child • unreconciled •bald, scald, so-called, uncalled, unwalled •Archibald • piebald • skewbald •Theobald • Cumbernauld

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