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calcium carbonate

calcium carbonate, CaCO3, white chemical compound that is the most common nonsiliceous mineral. It occurs in two crystal forms: calcite, which is hexagonal, and aragonite, which is rhombohedral. Calcium carbonate is largely insoluble in water but is quite soluble in water containing dissolved carbon dioxide, combining with it to form the bicarbonate Ca(HCO3)2. Such reactions on limestone (which is mainly composed of calcite) account for the formation of stalactites and stalagmites in caves. Iceland spar is a pure form of calcium carbonate and exhibits birefringence, or double refraction.

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calcium carbonate

calcium carbonate (CaCO3) White compound, insoluble in water, that occurs naturally as marble, chalk, limestone and calcite. Crystals are in the hexagonal system and vary in form. Calcium carbonate is used in the manufacture of cement, iron, steel and lime, to neutralize soil acidity and as a constituent of antacids. Properties: r.d. 2.7 (calcite).

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calcium carbonate

calcium carbonate (kar-bŏ-nayt) n. a salt of calcium that neutralizes acids and is used in many antacid preparations. It is also used as a calcium supplement and to reduce high blood levels of phosphates (which it binds) in patients with renal failure. Formula: CaCO3.

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calcium carbonate

cal·ci·um car·bon·ate • n. a white, insoluble solid, CaCO3, occurring naturally as chalk, limestone, marble, and calcite, and forming mollusk shells and stony corals.

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