Skip to main content

Jewish Book Council, The

JEWISH BOOK COUNCIL, THE

JEWISH BOOK COUNCIL, THE , the literary arm of the organized Jewish community. The Council was established in 1946 in North America and became an international organization in 2005 with the establishment of the Jewish Book Council in Israel. The renaissance of Jewish books in the English-speaking world served as catalyst to expand its boundaries. The world-wide mission is to promote the reading, writing and publishing of quality English language books of Jewish interest.

Among its most prominent activities to advance these goals are sponsorship of the National Jewish Book Awards, now in its 55th year, and sponsorship of Jewish Book Month, which runs annually 30 days before Ḥanukkah.

Among its publications are Jewish Book Annual and Jewish Book World: the Publishers Weekly of the Jewish World. Italso features Jewish Book network, a membership organization to promote Jewish book fairs in North America and Israel, and participates in major conferences, including the Jerusalem Book Fair, to promote Jewish books. The Council sponsors combined author programs between Israeli and American writers, and it serves as a resource for information on Jewish literature.

[Carolyn Hessel (2nd ed.)]

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Jewish Book Council, The." Encyclopaedia Judaica. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Jewish Book Council, The." Encyclopaedia Judaica. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/jewish-book-council

"Jewish Book Council, The." Encyclopaedia Judaica. . Retrieved August 18, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/jewish-book-council

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.