Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc. v. Federal Communications Commission 453 U.S. 367 (1981)

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COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM, INC. v. FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 453 U.S. 367 (1981)

A 1971 amendment to the communications act of 1934 permits the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to revoke a broadcaster's license for failure to allow reasonable access to a candidate for federal office. The Supreme Court here interpreted this provision to create a right of access for an individual candidate. Further, reaffirming the much criticized precedent of red lion broadcasting co. v. fcc (1969), the Court sustained the law, as so interpreted, against a first amendment challenge. The dissenters argued that the statute created no right of access.

Kenneth L. Karst
(1986)