independent assortment

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independent assortment (random assortment) The random distribution in the gametes of separate genes. If an individual has one pair of alleles A and a, and another pair B and b (this genotype being represented as AaBb) then it should produce equal numbers of four types of gamete: AB, Ab, aB, and ab. The assortment of alleles of one gene occurs independently of that of the alleles of the other gene. This is found experimentally with many pairs of genes, and is asserted in Mendel's second law, known as the law of independent assortment: in fact, though, it applies only to distantly linked or unlinked genes (see LINKAGE).

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independent assortment (random assortment) The random distribution in the gametes of separate genes. If an individual has one pair of alleles A and a, and another pair B and b (this genotype being represented as AaBb), then it should produce equal numbers of four types of gametes:AB, Ab, aB, and ab. The assortment of alleles of one gene occurs independently of that of the alleles of the other gene. This is found experimentally with many pairs of genes, and is asserted in Mendel's second law (the law of independent assortment); in fact, though, it applies only to distantly linked or unlinked genes.

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independent assortment The separation of the alleles of one gene into the reproductive cells (gametes) independently of the way in which the alleles of other genes have segregated. By this process all possible combinations of alleles should occur equally frequently in the gametes. In practice this does not happen because alleles situated on the same chromosome tend to be inherited together. However, if the allele pairs Aa and Bb are on different chromosomes, the combinations AB, Ab, aB, and ab will normally be equally likely to occur in the gametes. See meiosis; Mendel's laws.