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genotype

gen·o·type / ˈjenəˌtīp; ˈjē-/ • n. Biol. the genetic constitution of an individual organism. Often contrasted with phenotype. • v. [tr.] investigate the genetic constitution of (an individual organism): the person appointed will be responsible for maintaining and genotyping many different lines of zebra fish. DERIVATIVES: gen·o·typ·ic / ˌjenəˈtipik; ˌjē-/ adj.

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genotype

genotype The total set of alleles possessed by an organism. (Alleles are genes, which may be different or identical, that occupy matching sites on each of a pair of chromosomes.) Expression of these is responsible for the phenotype of the individual, which can be modified by environmental pressures.

Alan W. Cuthbert


See genetics, human; phenotype.

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genotype

genotype The genetic constitution of an organism, as opposed to its physical appearance (phenotype). Usually this refers to the specific allelic composition of a particular gene or set of genes in each cell of an organism, but it may also refer to the entire genome.

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genotype

genotype The genetic constitution of an organism, as opposed to its physical appearance (phenotype). Usually this refers to the specific allelic composition of a particular gene or set of genes in each cell of an organism, but it may also refer to the entire genome.

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genotype

genotype The genetic constitution of an organism, as opposed to its physical appearance (phenotype). Usually this refers to the specific allelic composition of a particular gene or set of genes in each cell of an organism, but it may also refer to the entire genome.

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genotype

genotype (jen-oh-typ) n.
1. the genetic constitution of an individual or group, as determined by the particular set of genes it possesses.

2. the genetic information carried by a pair of alleles, which determines a particular characteristic. Compare phenotype.

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genotype

genotype Genetic makeup of an individual. The particular set of genes present in each cell of an organism is distinct from the phenotype, the observable characteristics of the organism.

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genotype

genotype The genetic composition of an organism, i.e. the combination of alleles it possesses. Compare phenotype.

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genotype

genotype Genetic constitution of an organism, as opposed to its physical appearance (phenotype).

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genotype

genotype (jēn´ətīp´): see genetics.

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genotype

genotypegripe, hype, mistype, pipe, ripe, sipe, slype, snipe, stripe, swipe, tripe, type, wipe •guttersnipe • bagpipe • standpipe •tailpipe • drainpipe • pitchpipe •windpipe • hornpipe • blowpipe •stovepipe • hosepipe • soilpipe •pinstripe • archetype • logotype •phenotype • linotype • Monotype •electrotype • daguerreotype •subtype • stereotype • collotype •genotype, stenotype •prototype • sideswipe

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