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grunt

grunt, common name for members of the family Haemulidae, carnivorous fish of warm seas, most species of which are small and brightly colored. They are sound-producers, creating their noises by grinding their pharyngeal teeth together. Croakers, which belong to another family, are also sound-producing fish. Grunts are bottom-feeders with large mouths vividly colored in red or orange on the inside. The common, or white, grunt is a favorite food fish found on shallow sandy bottoms from the West Indies to the Carolinas; it averages 1 ft (30 cm) in length and 1 lb (.5 kg) in weight. The many species abundant off the Florida coasts include the margate, blue-striped, and gray grunts and the colorful porkfish, with a blue-striped yellow body and black head-bands. The California sargo is common along the Pacific coast and the commercially important pigfish is found from Long Island Sound to Texas. Grunts are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Actinopterygii, order Perciformes, family Haemulidae.

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grunt

grunt / grənt/ • v. [intr.] (of an animal, esp. a pig) make a low, short guttural sound. ∎  (of a person) make a low inarticulate sound resembling this, typically to express effort or indicate assent. • n. 1. a low, short guttural sound made by an animal or a person. 2. inf. a low-ranking or unskilled soldier or other worker. ∎  a common soldier. 3. an edible shoaling fish (family Pomadasyidae) of tropical inshore waters and coral reefs, able to make a loud noise by grinding its teeth and amplifying the sound in the swim bladder. ORIGIN: Old English grunnettan, of Germanic origin and related to German grunzen; probably originally imitative.

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Pomadasyidae

Pomadasyidae (javelinfish, grunt; subclass Actinopterygii, order Perciformes) A large family of marine, perchlike fish that have large eyes, a truncated tail fin, a long dorsal fin, and strong spines to the dorsal and pelvic fins. There are about 175 species, distributed worldwide.

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grunt

grunt make the characteristic sound of a pig. OE. grunnettan = OHG. grunnizōn (G. grunzen), intensive formation on the imit. base *ʒrun- (OE. grunian grunt, OHG. grun wailing, MHG. grunnen); cf. DISGRUNTLED.

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grunt

grunt
1. See POMADASYIDAE.

2. See THERAPONIDAE.

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grunt

gruntaccount, amount, count, fount, miscount, mount, no-account, surmount •headcount • viscount • paramount •tantamount •don't, won't, wont •anoint, appoint, conjoint, joint, outpoint, point, point-to-point •standpoint •cashpoint, flashpoint •checkpoint • endpoint • breakpoint •needlepoint • midpoint • pinpoint •vantage point • knifepoint •strongpoint • viewpoint • gunpoint •counterpoint • punt •affront, blunt, brunt, bunt, confront, cunt, front, Granth, grunt, hunt, mahant, runt, shunt, stunt, up-front •exeunt • manhunt • headhunt •witch-hunt • seafront • beachfront •shopfront •forefront, storefront •waterfront

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