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budding

budding
1. The formation of buds as a result of cell division in a localized area of a shoot. In general, budding is promoted by cytokinins and is inhibited by auxins.

2. The grafting of a bud on to a plant.

3. Gemmation, a form of asexual reproduction in which a new individual develops within the body wall or cell membrane of the parent, causing a bud-like swelling, then detaches itself to commence an independent life. In certain single-celled micro-organisms a new cell is formed by extrusion or out-growth from an existing cell. See also ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION.

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budding

budding
1. (in biology) A method of asexual reproduction in which a new individual is derived from an outgrowth (bud) that becomes detached from the body of the parent. In animals the process is also called gemmation; it is common in cnidarians (e.g. Hydra) and also occurs in some sponges and other invertebrates. Among fungi, budding is characteristic of the yeasts.

2. (in horticulture) A method of grafting in which a bud of the scion is inserted onto the stock, usually beneath the bark.

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budding

budding (gemmation)
1. A form of asexual reproduction in which a new individual develops within the body wall or cell membrane of the parent, causing a bud-like swelling, then detaches itself to commence an independent life. In certain single-celled micro-organisms a new cell is formed by extrusion or outgrowth from an existing cell.

2. In Hymenoptera, the migration of a group of workers and brood to a new nest site.

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budding

budding, type of grafting in which a plant bud is inserted under the bark of the stock (usually not more than a year old). It is best done when the bark will peel easily and the buds are mature, as in spring, late summer, or early autumn. Budding is a standard means of propagating roses and most fruit trees in nurseries. See propagation of plants.

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budding

budding Method of asexual reproduction that produces a new organism from an outgrowth of the parent. Hydras, for example, often bud in spring and summer. Yeasts also reproduce by budding. A small bulge appears on the parent and grows until it breaks away as a new individual.

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