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Auburn

Auburn (ô´bərn). 1 City (1990 pop. 33,830), Lee co., E Ala.; inc. 1839. The city's economy centers around Auburn Univ.; there is some manufacturing. 2 City (1990 pop. 24,309), seat of Androscoggin co., SW Maine, on the Androscoggin River (crossed by several bridges) opposite Lewiston; settled 1765 on the site of a Native American village, inc. 1842. With Lewiston, Auburn long formed one of the most important industrial complexes in Maine. Abundant water power spurred a large variety of manufactures, including shoes (manufactured there since c.1835) and bricks; in the late 20th cent., however, industry declined. Nearby Mt. Apatite is a source of apatite and feldspar. 3 City (1990 pop. 31,443), seat of Cayuga co., W central N.Y., in the Finger Lakes region, on the outlet of Owasco Lake; settled 1793, inc. 1848. Its manufactures include transportation equipment, machinery, rope, fiber-optic instruments, leather products, steel, fuel oil tanks, and electronic parts. It is the site of Auburn State Prison (built 1816), in which Thomas Mott Osborne, the prison reformer (who was born in Auburn), served a voluntary term. The city's museum has collections of historical documents and Native American relics. The houses of William H. Seward and Harriet Tubman are preserved. 4 City (1990 pop. 33,102), King co., W Wash., on the Green and White (Stuck) rivers, between Seattle and Tacoma; settled 1855, inc. 1914. It is a railroad junction and farm trade center. Auburn also possesses a large aircraft industry and is the site of a Federal Aviation Administration air traffic control center.

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auburn

au·burn / ˈôbərn/ • adj. (chiefly of a person's hair) of a reddish-brown color. • n. a reddish-brown color.

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auburn

auburn (orig.) yellowish-white, (now) golden-brown. XV. — OF. alborne, auborne :- medL. alburnus, f. L. albus white.

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auburn

auburnBrian, cyan, Gaian, Geminian, Hawaiian, ion, iron, Ixion, lion, Lyon, Mayan, Narayan, O'Brien, Orion, Paraguayan, prion, Ryan, scion, Uruguayan, Zion •andiron •gridiron, midiron •dandelion • anion • Bruneian •cation, flatiron •gowan, Palawan, rowen •anthozoan, bryozoan, Goan, hydrozoan, Minoan, protozoan, protozoon, rowan, Samoan, spermatozoon •Ohioan • Chicagoan • Virgoan •Idahoan •doyen, Illinoisan, IroquoianEwan, Labuan, McEwan, McLuhan, Siouan •Saskatchewan • Papuan • Paduan •Nicaraguan • gargantuan •carbon, chlorofluorocarbon, graben, hydrocarbon, Laban, radiocarbon •ebon • Melbourne • Theban •gibbon, ribbon •Brisbane, Lisbon •Tyburn •auburn, Bourbon •Alban • Manitoban • Cuban •stubborn •Durban, exurban, suburban, turban, urban

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