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Louis (titular duke of Burgundy)

Louis, 1682–1712, titular duke of Burgundy; grandson of King Louis XIV of France. He became heir to the throne on the death (1711) of his father, Louis the Great Dauphin. François de Fénelon was his tutor and wrote Télémaque for his use. Louis was the rallying point of the opposition to Louis XIV—reactionary nobles and liberals alike—and miracles were expected of him. When he died suddenly during an epidemic (possibly of scarlet fever), rumors of poisoning circulated. His death is described in a famous passage in the memoirs of the duc de Saint-Simon. He was the father of King Louis XV of France and the brother of King Philip V of Spain.

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Louis

Louis the name of eighteen kings of France, etymologically representing the name of Clovis, who as king of the Franks was seen as founder of the French kingdom.

St Louis (1214–70), king of France (as Louis IX, from 1226), built the Sainte Chapelle in Paris as a shrine for the relic of Christ's Crown of Thorns. His feast day is 25 August.

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King Georges War

King George's War (1744–48) Inconclusive struggle between France and Britain for control of North America. Both sides enlisted Native American allies in fighting disputed boundaries in Nova Scotia, New England and the Ohio Valley. The Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle (1748) restored conquered territory by mutual agreement.

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louis

louis French gold coin. XVII. In full louis d'or (of gold); application of the name of many French kings :- Ludovīcus, latinization of G. Ludwig.

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louis

louisbiz, Cadíz, Cadiz, fizz, frizz, gee-whiz, his, is, jizz, Liz, Ms, phiz, quiz, squiz, swizz, tizz, viz, whizz, wiz, zizz •louis, Suez •scabies •Celebes, heebie-jeebies •showbiz • laches • Marches • breeches •Indies • undies • hafiz • Kyrgyz •Hedges • Bridges • Hodges • Judges •Rockies • walkies •Gillies, Scillies •pennies • Benares •Jefferies, Jeffreys •Canaries •Delores, Flores, furores •series • miniseries • Furies •congeries • Potteries • molasses •glasses • sunglasses • missus • suffix •falsies • fracases • galluses •Pontine Marshes • species •subspecies • conches • munchies •treatise •civvies, Skivvies •Velázquez • exequies • obsequies •Menzies • elevenses •cosies (US cozies), Moses •Joneses

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