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hull

hull1 / həl/ • n. the main body of a ship or other vessel, including the bottom, sides, and deck but not the masts, superstructure, rigging, engines, and other fittings. • v. [tr.] (usu. be hulled) hit and pierce the hull of (a ship) with a shell or other missile. DERIVATIVES: hulled adj. [in comb.] a wooden-hulled narrowboat. hull2 • n. the outer covering of a fruit or seed, esp. the pod of peas and beans, or the husk of grain. ∎  the green calyx of a strawberry or raspberry. • v. [tr.] [usu. as adj.] (hulled) remove the hulls from (fruit, seeds, or grain).

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hull

hull1 (dial.) shell of peas and beans. Late OE. hulu, f. base of helan cover.
Hence vb. XIV.

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hull

hull2 body or frame of a ship. XV (ho(o)le, holle). perh. sb. use of hol HOLLOW.

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hull

hull See husk.

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hull

hullannul, cull, dull, gull, hull, lull, mull, null, scull, skull, Solihull, trull, Tull •seagull • multihull • monohull •numbskull • Elul

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Hull

Hull (officially Kingston upon Hull) City and unitary authority on the n bank of the Humber estuary, ne England. Britain's third largest port, it was founded in the late 13th century and grew around its fishing industry. Hull gained city status in 1897. The decline of the fishing industry has been partly offset by the construction of the Humber Bridge (1981), one of the world's longest single-span suspension bridges. The city is home to the University of Hull (1954) and the University of Humberside (1992). Pop. (1994 est.) 269,144.

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Hull

HULL

HULL , seaport in N.E. England. According to an absurd 19th-century forgery, David de *Pomis settled here in 1599. A community was organized in the last quarter of the 18th century, a deconsecrated Catholic chapel serving as the first synagogue. In the 19th century, Hull was the principal British port of entry from northern Europe. Large numbers of Jewish immigrants landed there, necessitating the foundation of a second synagogue in 1886 and a third in 1902. Both of the old synagogues had to be rebuilt after having been destroyed in World War ii. Numerous charitable organizations also grew up. In 1968 the community was said to number approximately 2,500, and, in the mid-1990s, about 1,120. The 2001 census revealed 670 declared Jews in Hull, which contained an Orthodox and Reform synagogue.

bibliography:

C. Roth, Rise of Provincial Jewry (1950), 70f.; Lehmann, Nova Bibl, index; J. Lewenstein, Story of the Hull Western Synagogue (1953); L. Rosen, Short History of the Jewish Community in Hull (1956); Finestein, in: Gates of Zion, 11 no. 4 (1957), 7–13; jyb (1969). add. bibliography: I. Finestein, "The Jews in Hull between 1766 and 1830," in: jhset, 35 (1998), 33–92.

[Cecil Roth]

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