Skip to main content
Select Source:

Daśabala

Daśabala

astronomy.

Daśabala, the son of Vairocana and member of a family from Vallabhī in Saurāṣṭra, was a Buddhist with Śaivite leanings. He wrote two works on astronomy, both of which belong to the Brāhmapakṣa (see Essay IV), as modified by the Rājamṛgān̄ka (written 1042) of his contemporary, the Paramāra monarch Bhojarāja (fl. ca. 999–1056).

The Cintāmanṇisāraṇikā was written in Śaka 977 (a. d. 1055), while Bhoja was still in power. It contains six sections:

  1. On tithis (sixty-two verses)
  2. On nakṣatras (nineteen verses)
  3. On yogas (twenty-one verses)
  4. On diverse subjects (thirty-six verses)
  5. On san̄krāntis (four verses)
  6. On the sixty-year cycle of Jupiter (sixteen verses).

There is a commentary on it written by Mahādeva, the son of Lūṇiga, also a Gujarātī, in Śaka 1180 a. d. 1258).

Daśabala’s second work, the Karaṇakamalamārtaṇḍa, was written in Śaka 980 (a. d. 1058). It contains ten chapters with 270 verses:

  1. On mean motions
  2. On true longitudes
  3. On the three questions relating to the diurnal motion
  4. On lunar eclipses
  5. On solar eclipses
  6. On heliacal risings and settings
  7. On the lunar crescent
  8. On the mahāpātas
  9. On conjunctions of the planets
  10. On intercalary months and the sixty-year cycle of Jupiter.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

The Cintāmaṇisāraṇikā has been edited by D. D. Kosambi in Journal of Oriental Research, 19 (1952), supp. The Karaṇakamalamärtaṇḍa is known only from the description in Ś. B. Dīkṣita. Bhāratīya Jyotiḥśāstra (Poona, 1896: repr., 1931), pp. 239–240.

David Pingree

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Daśabala." Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Daśabala." Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 17, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dasabala

"Daśabala." Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography. . Retrieved February 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dasabala

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Daśabala

Daśabala (Skt.; Pāli, dasabala). The ten powers of a Buddha which confer knowledge on him of: (i) what is possible and impossible; (ii) the consequence of actions (vipāka); (iii) the abilities of other beings; (iv) the direction of their lives; (v) the constituents of manifest appearances; (vi) the paths leading to the different domains of existence; (vii) those leading to purity and impurity; (viii) the states of meditation (samādhi) and absorptions (dhyāna); (ix) deaths and reappearances; (x) the eradication of all defilements (the three destructive poisons, Skt., āśrava Pāli, āsava: of desire, kāma, of becoming in manifest form, bhāva, and of ignorance, avidyā/avijja).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Daśabala." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Daśabala." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 17, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dasabala

"Daśabala." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved February 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dasabala

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.