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Tay

Tay

"Tay" (Tày, Tho, Thu) is a general term used in reference to the large, rural, Thai-speaking population in Vietnam, primarily in northern Vietnam. In 1985, the total number of people classified as "Tay" was 1,190,342, making them the largest ethnic population in Vietnam other than the Vietnamese themselves. Tay are an official national minority in Vietnam. It is not clear, however, what specific groups fall within the official definition of "Tay." The Tay were previously often referred to as "Tho," meaning "soil," but the term is now considered derogatory and "Tay" is preferred. The Tay have traditionally been agriculturalists, growing rice in pad-Dies and by swiddening and also raising maize, buckwheat, watercress, sugar cane, manioc, and various other vegetables for home use. Tay villages were centers of regional economic activities, with local markets rotating among a series of villages. Markets often involved trade between the Tay and Vietnamese and Chinese merchants. Today, the Tay are highly assimilated into Vietnamese society.

Bibliography

Hickey, Gerald C. (1958). "Social Systems of Northern Viet Nam: A Study of Systems in Contact." Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Chicago.

Hickey, Gerald C. (1964). "Tho." In Ethnic Groups of Mainland Southeast Asia, edited by Frank M. LeBar, Gerald C. Hickey, and John K. Musgrave, 232-235. New Haven: HRAF Press.

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Tay

Tay (tā), longest river of Scotland, 118 mi (190 km) long. It rises on Ben Lui in the Grampians as the Fillan and flows NE into Loch Dochart, where it is called the Dochart until it enters Loch Tay, 141/2 mi (23 km) long and 1 mi (1.6 km) wide. Turning SE at the junction with the Tummel River, its chief tributary, the Tay enters the North Sea through the Firth of Tay (25 mi/40 km long). The river has important salmon fisheries. Tay Bridge crosses the firth at Dundee. The original bridge collapsed (Dec. 28, 1879) during a storm, with the loss of 90 lives, and was rebuilt (1883–88).

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Tay

Tay River in central Scotland, rising in the Grampians and flowing se to enter the North Sea through the Firth of Tay near Dundee. At 193km (120mi), it is the longest river in Scotland and has the largest drainage basin, 6200sq km (2400sq mi) in area. The Tay Bridge (1883–88) crosses the firth at Dundee.

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Tay

Tayaffray, agley, aka, allay, Angers, A-OK, appellation contrôlée, array, assay, astray, au fait, auto-da-fé, away, aweigh, aye, bay, belay, betray, bey, Bombay, Bordet, boulevardier, bouquet, brae, bray, café au lait, Carné, cassoulet, Cathay, chassé, chevet, chez, chiné, clay, convey, Cray, crème brûlée, crudités, cuvée, cy-pres, day, decay, deejay, dégagé, distinguée, downplay, dray, Dufay, Dushanbe, eh, embay, engagé, essay, everyday, faraway, fay, fey, flay, fray, Frey, fromage frais, gainsay, gay, Gaye, Genet, gilet, glissé, gray, grey, halfway, hay, heigh, hey, hooray, Hubei, Hué, hurray, inveigh, jay, jeunesse dorée, José, Kay, Kaye, Klee, Kray, Lae, lay, lei, Littré, Lough Neagh, lwei, Mae, maguey, Malay, Mallarmé, Mandalay, Marseilles, may, midday, midway, mislay, misplay, Monterrey, Na-Dene, nay, né, née, neigh, Ney, noway, obey, O'Dea, okay, olé, outlay, outplay, outstay, outweigh, oyez, part-way, pay, Pei, per se, pince-nez, play, portray, pray, prey, purvey, qua, Quai d'Orsay, Rae, rangé, ray, re, reflet, relevé, roman-à-clef, Santa Fé, say, sei, Shar Pei, shay, slay, sleigh, sley, spae, spay, Spey, splay, spray, stay, straightaway, straightway, strathspey, stray, Sui, survey, sway, Taipei, Tay, they, today, tokay, Torbay, Tournai, trait, tray, trey, two-way, ukiyo-e, underlay, way, waylay, Wei, weigh, wey, Whangarei, whey, yea

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