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Apostasy

29. Apostasy (See also Sacrilege.)

  1. Aholah and Aholibah symbolize Samarias and Jerusalems abandonment to idols. [O.T.: Ezekiel 23:4]
  2. Albigenses heretical sect; advocated Manichaean dualism. [Fr. Hist.: NCE, 53]
  3. Arians 4th-century heretical sect; denied Christs divinity. [Christian Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 43]
  4. Big-endians heretical group; always break eggs unlawfully at large end. [Br. Lit.: Gullivers Travels ]
  5. Cathari heretical Christian sect in 12th and 13th centuries; professed a neo-Manichaean dualism. [Christian Hist.: EB, II: 639]
  6. Donatists Christian group in North Africa who broke with Catholicism (312). [Christian Hist.: EB, III: 618]
  7. Ebionites 2nd- and 3rd-century Christian ascetic sect that retained a Jewish emphasis. [Christian Hist.: EB, III: 768]
  8. Erastianism doctrine declaring state is superior to the church in ecclesiastical affairs (15241543). [Christian Hist.: EB, III: 937]
  9. Fires of Smithfield Marian martyrs burnt at stake as heretics. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1013]
  10. Gnosticism heretical theological movement in Greco-Roman world of 2nd century. [Christian Hist.: EB, IV: 587]
  11. Inquisition Roman Catholic tribunal engaged in combating and suppressing heresy. [Christian Hist.: NCE, 1352]
  12. Jansenism unorthodox Roman Catholic movement of the 17th and 18th centuries led by Cornelius Jansen. [Christian Hist.: EB, V: 515]
  13. Julian the Apostate (331363 ) Roman emperor, educated as a Christian but renounced Christianity when he became emperor. [Rom. Hist.: Benét, 533]
  14. Lollards in late medieval England, a name given to followers of unorthodox philosopher John Wycliffe. [Christian Hist.: EB, VI: 306]
  15. min appellation of any heretic, Jew or non-Jew. [Judaism: Wigoder, 417]
  16. Monophysites heretical Christian sect who questioned the divine and human nature of Jesus. [Christian Hist.: EB, VI: 1003]
  17. Montanism 2nd-century heretical Christian movement led by prophet Montanus. [Christian Hist.: EB, VI: 1012]
  18. Sabellianism 3rd-century Christian heresy led by Sabellius. [Christian Hist.: EB, VIII: 747]

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Apostasy

Apostasy, (Gk., ‘stand away from’). The act or state of rejecting one religious faith for another. Apostasy has been regarded with horror by Jews, although a distinction was always made between apostates who converted for gain and the anusim or Marranos who were forced to convert and tried to maintain their Judaism secretly. According to the halakhah, an apostate remains a Jew: he can contract a valid Jewish marriage, and the child of an apostate mother is considered a Jew. However, as the law stands at present, an apostate Jew is not entitled to immigrate to Israel under the law of Return.

In Christianity, the debate mainly took the form of the ability of one elected to salvation to fall from grace (see e.g. ARMINIUS). In Islam, the issue is extremely prominent, involving the argument whether it requires the death penalty: see MURTADD.

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apostate

a·pos·tate / əˈpäsˌtāt; -tit/ • n. a person who renounces a religious or political belief or principle. • adj. abandoning a religious or political belief or principle. DERIVATIVES: ap·o·stat·i·cal / ˌapəˈstatikəl/ adj.

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apostate

apostate XIV. — (O)F. apostate or ecclL. apostata — late Gr. apostātēs, f. apostēnai, f. apó APO- + stênai STAND.
So apostasy XIV. — ecclL. — late Gr. apostasíā, for apóstasis defection. apostatize XVI. — medL.

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apostate

apostate a person who renounces a religious or political belief or principle. Recorded from Middle English, the word comes via ecclesiastical Latin from Greek apostatēs ‘apostate, runaway slave’.

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apostasy

a·pos·ta·sy / əˈpästəsē/ • n. the abandonment or renunciation of a religious or political belief.

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apostasy

apostasy, in religion: see heresy.

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apostasy

apostasy •radiancy •immediacy, intermediacy •expediency • idiocy • saliency •resiliency • leniency •incipiency, recipiency •recreancy • pruriency • deviancy •subserviency • transiency • pliancy •buoyancy, flamboyancy •fluency, truancy •constituency • abbacy • embassy •celibacy • absorbency •incumbency, recumbency •ascendancy, intendancy, interdependency, pendency, resplendency, superintendency, tendency, transcendency •candidacy •presidency, residency •despondency • redundancy • infancy •sycophancy • argosy • legacy •profligacy • surrogacy •extravagancy • plangency • agency •regency •astringency, contingency, stringency •intransigency • exigency • cogency •pungency •convergency, emergency, insurgency, urgency •vacancy • piquancy • fricassee •mendicancy • efficacy • prolificacy •insignificancy • delicacy • intricacy •advocacy • fallacy • galaxy •jealousy, prelacy •repellency • valency • Wallasey •articulacy • corpulency • inviolacy •excellency • equivalency • pharmacy •supremacy • clemency • Christmassy •illegitimacy, legitimacy •intimacy • ultimacy • primacy •dormancy • diplomacy • contumacy •stagnancy •lieutenancy, subtenancy, tenancy •pregnancy •benignancy, malignancy •effeminacy • prominency •obstinacy • pertinency • lunacy •immanency •impermanency, permanency •rampancy • papacy • flippancy •occupancy •archiepiscopacy, episcopacy •transparency • leprosy • inerrancy •flagrancy, fragrancy, vagrancy •conspiracy • idiosyncrasy •minstrelsy • magistracy • piracy •vibrancy •adhocracy, aristocracy, autocracy, bureaucracy, democracy, gerontocracy, gynaecocracy (US gynecocracy), hierocracy, hypocrisy, meritocracy, mobocracy, monocracy, plutocracy, technocracy, theocracy •accuracy • obduracy • currency •curacy, pleurisy •confederacy • numeracy •degeneracy • itinerancy • inveteracy •illiteracy, literacy •innocency • trenchancy • deficiency •fantasy, phantasy •intestacy • ecstasy • expectancy •latency • chieftaincy • intermittency •consistency, insistency, persistency •instancy • militancy • impenitency •precipitancy • competency •hesitancy • apostasy • constancy •accountancy • adjutancy •consultancy, exultancy •impotency • discourtesy •inadvertency • privacy •irrelevancy, relevancy •solvency • frequency • delinquency •adequacy • poignancy

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apostate

apostatelactate, tractate •apartheid • peltate • edentate •testate • dictate • meditate • agitate •vegetate • interdigitate •cogitate, excogitate •ingurgitate, regurgitate •facilitate, habilitate, militate •debilitate • imitate • decapitate •palpitate • crepitate • precipitate •irritate •acetate, capacitate, triacetate •necessitate • felicitate • resuscitate •gravitate • levitate • hesitate •apostate, prostate •pernoctate • potentate • annotate •amputate • permutate • orientate •auscultate • commentate • superstate •devastate • salivate • elevate •activate • captivate • titivate •motivate • cultivate • ovate • excavate •enervate, renovate •innovate • aggravate • rotavate

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