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Saturn

Saturn in Roman mythology, an ancient god (Latin Saturnus may come from Etruscan), originally regarded as a god of agriculture, but in classical times identified with the Greek Cronus, deposed by his son Zeus (Jupiter). His festival in December, Saturnalia, eventually became one of the elements in the traditional celebrations of Christmas.

Saturn was the name given to the most remote of the seven planets known to ancient astronomy (now known to be the sixth planet from the sun in the solar system). In astrology, on account of its remoteness and slowness of motion, Saturn was supposed to cause coldness, sluggishness, and gloominess of temperament in those born under its influence, and in general to have a baleful effect on human affairs.

Saturn is also the name of a series of American space rockets, of which the very large Saturn V was used as the launch vehicle for the Apollo missions of 1969–72.

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Saturn

Saturn

Saturn, the Roman god of agriculture, was identified with the Greek god Cronus. In Roman mythology, Saturn fled Greece and settled in Italy after losing a battle with Jupiter*. Saturn became the king of Latium (the area of central Italy that includes Rome) and ruled over a golden age of peace and prosperity. During this time, he taught the people how to plant and tend crops and how to lead civilized lives.

His festival was the Saturnalia, a celebration beginning on December 17 and ending December 25. During Saturnalia, businesses closed, people exchanged presents, and slaves were given the freedom to do and say what they wished. Christians later honored the last day of Saturnalia as the date of the birth of Jesus. Saturn also gave his name to the day of the week known as Saturday.

See also Cronus.

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Saturn (in Roman religion and mythology)

Saturn, in Roman religion and mythology, god of harvests, later identified with the Greek Kronos. Little is known of the origins of his cult. His reign was regarded as the Golden Age. He was the husband of Ops and the father of Jupiter, Juno, Ceres, Pluto, and Neptune. It was said that after the fall of the Titans, Saturn fled to Italy, where he settled on the Capitoline Hill, civilized the people, and taught them the arts of agriculture. At his festival, the Saturnalia, held at first on Dec. 17 but later extended for several days thereafter, gifts were exchanged, schools and courts were closed, war was outlawed, and slaves and masters ate at the same table.

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Saturn

Saturn Italic god of agriculture OE.; (astron.) one of the primary planets XIV (in OE. Sæternes steorra); †(alch.) lead. — L. Sāturnus poss. of Etruscan orig.
So Saturnalia festival of Saturn marked by unrestrained revelry XVI (transf. XVIII). — L., sb. use of n. pl. of Sāturnālis; see -AL1. Saturnian ancient Roman metre. XVI. saturnine (-INE1) born under Saturn, (hence) of cold and gloomy temperament. XV, — F. saturnin — medL. *sāturnīnus.

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Saturn

Sat·urn / ˈsatərn/ 1. Roman Mythol. an ancient god, regarded as a god of agriculture. 2. Astron. the sixth planet from the sun in the solar system, circled by a system of broad, flat rings. 3. a series of American space rockets, of which the very large Saturn V was used as the launch vehicle for the Apollo missions of 1969–72.

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Saturn

Saturnbaton, batten, fatten, flatten, harmattan, Manhattan, Mountbatten, paten, patten, pattern, platen, Saturn, slattern •Shackleton • Appleton •Hampton, Northampton, Rockhampton, Southampton, Wolverhampton •Canton, lantern, Scranton •Langton, plankton •Clapton •Aston, pastern •Gladstone •Caxton, Paxton •capstan • Ashton • phytoplankton •Akhenaten, Akhetaten, Aten, Barton, carton, Dumbarton, hearten, Parton, smarten, spartan, tartan •Grafton •Carlton, Charlton •Charleston • kindergarten •Aldermaston •Breton, jetton, Sowetan, threaten, Tibetan •lectern •Elton, melton, Skelton •Denton, Fenton, Kenton, Lenten, Trenton •Repton •Avestan, Midwestern, northwestern, Preston, southwestern, western •sexton •Clayton, Deighton, Leighton, Paton, phaeton, Satan, straighten, straiten •Paignton • Maidstone •beaten, Beaton, Beeton, Cretan, Keaton, neaten, Nuneaton, overeaten, sweeten, uneaten, wheaten •chieftain •eastern, northeastern, southeastern •browbeaten • weatherbeaten •bitten, bittern, Britain, Briton, Britten, handwritten, hardbitten, kitten, Lytton, mitten, smitten, underwritten, witan, written •Clifton •Milton, Shilton, Stilton, Wilton •Middleton • singleton • simpleton •Clinton, Linton, Minton, Quinton, Winton •cistern, Liston, piston, Wystan •brimstone • Winston • Kingston •Addington • Eddington •Workington •Arlington, Darlington •skeleton •Ellington, wellington •exoskeleton •cosmopolitan, megalopolitan, metropolitan, Neapolitan •Burlington • Hamilton • badminton •lamington • Germiston • Penistone •Bonington • Orpington • Samaritan •Carrington, Harrington •sacristan • Festschriften •Sherrington • typewritten •Warrington • puritan • Fredericton •Lexington • Occitan • Washington •Whittington • Huntington •Galveston • Livingstone •Kensington •Blyton, brighten, Brighton, Crichton, enlighten, frighten, heighten, lighten, righten, tighten, titan, triton, whiten •begotten, cotton, forgotten, ill-gotten, misbegotten, rotten •Compton, Crompton •wanton • Longton •Boston, postern •boughten, chorten, foreshorten, Laughton, Morton, Naughton, Orton, quartan, quartern, shorten, tauten, torten, Wharton •Alton, Dalton, Galton, saltern, Walton •Taunton • Allston • Launceston •croton, Dakotan, Minnesotan, oaten, verboten •Bolton, Doulton, molten •Folkestone • Royston •Luton, newton, rambutan, Teuton •Houston • Fulton •button, glutton, Hutton, mutton •sultan •doubleton, subaltern •fronton • Augustan • Dunstan •tungsten • quieten • Pinkerton •charlatan • Wollaston • Palmerston •Edmonton • automaton • Sheraton •Geraldton • Chatterton • Betterton •Chesterton • Athelstan •burton, curtain, uncertain •Hurston

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