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Blakeslee, Albert Francis

Albert Francis Blakeslee, 1874–1954, American botanist, b. Genesee, New York. He received his Ph.D. at Harvard (1904) and was a member of the faculty until 1907. After several years as professor at Connecticut Agricultural College (now the Univ. of Connecticut), he joined the staff of the Carnegie Institution of Washington at Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y., and later served as its director (1936–41). In 1943 he became director of the Smith College Genetics Experiment Station. From his earliest research, the discovery of sexual reproduction in bread molds, his contributions to botany and genetics were of far-reaching significance. His study of the inheritance and geographical distribution of the jimson weed, Datura, provided important information concerning chromosome behavior, genic balance, and species evolution. He introduced the use of the alkaloid colchicine to increase the number of chromosomes in the plant cell.

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Sinatra, Frank (Francis) (Albert)

Sinatra, Frank [Francis] (Albert) (b Hoboken, NJ, 1915; d Los Angeles, 1998). Amer. singer (light baritone) and actor. Radio début 1938. Sang with Harry James Band (1939) and Tommy Dorsey Band (1940–2). Solo career from 1942, with radio shows. Inspired excitement among ‘bobbysoxers’ of 1940s unequalled until advent of Elvis Presley and Beatles. Had successful career as ‘straight’ film actor, e.g. From Here to Eternity (1952), Von Ryan's Express (1965), and The Detective (1968). Resumed vocal career and made international tours in 1970s. Secret of his artistry was his emphasis on significance of a song's lyrics.

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