Autolycus

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Autolycus in Greek mythology, a notable thief who was a son of Hermes, and who stole his neighbours' flocks and concealed them among his own animals.

In Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, the pedlar and petty thief Autolycus describes himself as a ‘snapper up of unconsidered trifles’.

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Autolycus In Greek mythology, son of Hermes and the mortal Chione. He received from his father the gift of making whatever he touched invisible. In this way, he was able to commit numerous thefts until one day he was caught by Sisyphus, whose oxen he had stolen.

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Autolycus, in Greek mythology, the son of Hermes, from whom he received special powers in thieving and trickery. According to one legend Autolycus stole from Sisyphus, who revenged himself by seducing Autolycus' daughter Anticlea, who was Odysseus' mother.

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Autolycus (ôtŏl´Ĭkəs), fl. 4th cent. BC, astronomer and mathematician of Pitane in Aeolis. Of his two extant works, that on the revolving sphere is said to be the oldest completely preserved Greek treatise on a mathematical subject. The other deals with the apparent rising and setting of the fixed stars.