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Andrewes, Lancelot

Lancelot Andrewes (ăn´drōōz), 1555–1626, Anglican divine, bishop of Chichester (1605), Ely (1609), and Winchester (1619). One of the most learned men of his time (his knowledge encompassed 16 centuries of Christian culture and he knew 15 modern and six ancient languages), he was among the first to be selected to create what became the Church of England's Authorized Version of the Bible (the King James Version). He was royal chaplain to Elizabeth I, James I, and Charles I. His preaching gained him great favor with King James. The great theologian of the High Church party of the 17th cent., Andrewes was opposed to Puritanism, his position being somewhat similar to that of Laud. His XCVI Sermons were edited (1629) by bishops Laud and Buckeridge; his Private Devotions, translated (1647) from his prayers in Greek and Latin, passed through a number of editions. Richard Crashaw, the poet, paid him a beautiful tribute in "Upon Bishop Andrewes' Picture before His Sermons," and Milton, a Puritan, wrote a Latin elegy on his death.

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Andrewes, Lancelot

Andrewes, Lancelot (1555–1626). Bishop of Chichester (1605), Ely (1609), and Winchester (1619–26). Educated at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, Andrewes was a scholar of great erudition, conversant with fifteen languages. One of those appointed to prepare a new translation of the Bible (1604), he was largely responsible for the Pentateuch and historical books of the Old Testament.

Both in his lifetime and subsequently his fame has largely rested on his ability as a preacher and devotional writer. His sermons were influential in formulating a distinctive Anglican theology. They owe much to the Greek fathers, particularly Chrysostom, but are none the less firmly founded in western catholic thought. In style they are complex, abounding in puns and containing untranslated quotations from Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, thus making great demands upon his hearers. His Preces privatae are carefully arranged, revealing Andrewes's rare but precious gift for the expression in writing of devotion and prayer.

Revd Dr John R. Guy

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Andrewes, Lancelot

Andrewes, Lancelot (1555–1626). Anglican bishop. In 1601 he became Dean of Westminster, was consecrated bishop in 1605, becoming bishop of Winchester in 1619. He was famous as a preacher, and it is on his sermons and his Preces Privatae (Private Prayers) that his importance rests. T. S. Eliot regarded his sermons as ranking ‘with the finest English prose of their time, of any time’ (For Lancelot Andrewes): ‘He takes a word and derives a world from it.’

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