Skip to main content
Select Source:

Maclise, Daniel

Maclise, Daniel (1806–70). Historical and portrait painter and caricaturist. Born in Cork, the son of a Scottish soldier, Maclise became a student of Cork Academy when it opened in 1822, and of the Royal Academy Schools in London in 1828. Between 1830 and 1838, Fraser's Magazine published a series of his character drawings of literary men of the day, under the pseudonym Alfred Croquis. One of these was of his friend Charles Dickens for whom he also did book illustrations. In 1840 he was elected RA but later declined the presidency and a knighthood. Between 1857 and 1866 he was occupied with his best-known work: two frescos for the royal gallery of the new House of Lords, Wellington and Blücher at Waterloo and The Death of Nelson, of which Rossetti said, ‘These are such “historical” pictures as the world perhaps had never seen before.’

June Cochrane

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Maclise, Daniel." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Maclise, Daniel." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 16, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/maclise-daniel

"Maclise, Daniel." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved July 16, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/maclise-daniel

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Maclise, Daniel

Daniel Maclise (məklēs´), 1811–70, British painter and illustrator, b. Ireland. His character sketches contributed (1830–38) to Fraser's Magazine under the pseudonym Alfred Croquis were later published as The Maclise Portrait Gallery (1871). He was an excellent portraitist and painted his friend Dickens (National Gall., London). Maclise also executed the dramatic narrative scenes, The Meeting of Wellington and Blücher and The Death of Nelson in Westminster Palace, London. Among the writings he illustrated were Dickens's Christmas books and Moore's Irish Melodies.

See memoir by W. J. O'Driscoll (1871).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Maclise, Daniel." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Maclise, Daniel." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 16, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/maclise-daniel

"Maclise, Daniel." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved July 16, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/maclise-daniel

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.