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Boehner, John Andrew

John Andrew Boehner (bā´nər), 1949–, American congressman, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives (2011–), b. Cincinnati. A business executive and a Republican member (1985–90) of the Ohio house of representatives, he first won election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1990, and became an ally of Newt Gingrich. House Republican Conference chairman from 1995 to 1999, he also chaired (2001–6) the House committee on education and the workforce. Boehner subsequently served as House majority leader (2006–7), succeeding Tom DeLay, and as House minority leader (2007–11). After the Republicans won control of the House in the 2010 elections, he became House speaker.

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Ogdon, John (Andrew Howard)

Ogdon, John (Andrew Howard) (b Mansfield, 1937; d London, 1989). Eng. pianist and composer. As a student gave f.ps. of his own works and those by fellow-students Goehr and Maxwell Davies. Played Brahms's 1st conc. with Barbirolli, 1956, when still a student; début with Hallé Orch. 1957. Joint first prize (with Ashkenazy), Moscow Tchaikovsky comp. 1962. Brilliant exponent of Liszt, Busoni, Alkan, in addition to wide repertory of concs. NY début 1963. Taught at Indiana Univ. Sch. of Mus., Bloomington, 1976–80. Composer of pf. conc., etc.

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Ogdon, John

Ogdon, John (1937–89) English pianist and composer. He established his strong international reputation in 1962 when he was joint winner of the Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow with Vladimir Ashkenazy.

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