Skip to main content
Select Source:

York, Edward, duke of

Edward York, duke of, 1373?–1415, English nobleman; elder son of Edmund of Langley, duke of York. In 1390, Edward was made earl of Rutland, and in 1394 he was created earl of Cork while with his cousin Richard II in Ireland. He acted for the king in the marriage negotiations for the hand of Isabella of France. For his help in the proceedings (1397) against the lords appellant, Richard gave him the lands of the attainted Thomas of Woodstock, duke of Gloucester, and the title duke of Aumâle (Albemarle). He espoused the cause of Henry of Lancaster (Henry IV) against Richard in 1399, but he was accused in Parliament of complicity in the murder of Gloucester and lost his dukedom. He was soon restored to favor, however, and in 1402 he succeeded his father as duke of York. He was appointed (1403) lieutenant of South Wales, but discontent over lack of funds led him to join in an unsuccessful plot to kidnap and make king the captive Edmund de Mortimer, 5th earl of March. York was imprisoned (1405) but was later released and made a privy councilor. Subsequently he served Henry IV in Wales and France and was killed while fighting for Henry V at Agincourt. He was succeeded as duke of York by his nephew, Richard.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"York, Edward, duke of." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"York, Edward, duke of." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 18, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/york-edward-duke

"York, Edward, duke of." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved September 18, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/york-edward-duke

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

York, Edward of York, 2nd duke of

York, Edward of York, 2nd duke of (c.1373–1415). The elder son of Edmund of Langley (whom he succeeded as duke in 1402), in 1390 Edward was created earl of Rutland by Richard II, with whom he was a particular favourite. He was a prominent supporter of Richard's coup in 1397, when his rewards included the title of duke of Aumale, which he lost after Henry IV's usurpation. He was accused of murdering Thomas of Woodstock, betraying Richard in 1399, revealing the plot to kill Henry, and in 1405 conspiring against Henry. He continued, however, to serve Henry in Wales and Gascony. Edward commanded the van of Henry V's army at Agincourt, where he was killed. As he was childless, his nephew Richard was heir to his great estates; many were in the east midlands, where he founded Fotheringhay collegiate church, where he was buried.

R. L. Storey

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"York, Edward of York, 2nd duke of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"York, Edward of York, 2nd duke of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 18, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/york-edward-york-2nd-duke

"York, Edward of York, 2nd duke of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved September 18, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/york-edward-york-2nd-duke

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.